Why has Eloise Hawking always appeared to be one step ahead in knowing what's going on? Will she be appearing in the finale? For obvious reasons, the producers said they could not answer. They did get quite a laugh, though, when they said her apparent powers of comprehension come from "her hair." They did use this question to explain how Hawking has often functioned for them in the role of "Johnny the Explainer" (a role other characters, such as Ben, have filled on occasion). They never wanted there to be one "Johnny," mostly because they did not want there to be one final human authority on anything, just like in real life. There's no rulebook or ready explanation for your journey, but (just like in the game Myst I have referenced so often), you have to work much of it out as you go along.

 

Why did the Others think Walt was "special?" And how did he appear on the Island from off-island? They answered this question by admitting that yes, Walt is/was special, and that they have used this word, "special," to describe several characters through the course of the show. Lindelof cited a "mobisode" from Season Three that was on the web, in which Walt's experiences in Room 23 were shown to some extent. Basically, just as they had Ben and Miss Klugh say in the show, the Others "got more than they bargained for" with Walt. "He started freaking them out," said Cuse.

 

Asked whether / how creating the show has changed their views on Faith and God, the producers said, well, it was more the other way around. The show provided a vehicle for them to illuminate thoughts on faith (emphasizing how this will be very big in the finale). They talked about the questions we all have, the answers we seek, and how we do life together, in community. They compared creating the show - the togetherness of the team, the processes of finding the answers, the shared lives - to how we all seek, love, work, and lift each other up in our daily lives. I believe the way Cuse put it was, "Disparate people form community under extraordinary circumstances." And with this one line, he perfectly tied in what they had been trying to get across all night how the creation and evolution of the show among the writing staff paralleled the story being told within the show.

 

This theme continued when a different audience member asked why is it necessary for there to be human presence on the Island? In other words, can't it just protect itself? The producers said that first of all, an empty Island wouldn't make for a very good story. Second, they said, "the Garden of Eden didn't really get interesting until there were people in it." And that's what their story is on one level all about - what difference do people make. Are they basically good, or basically bad? What will they sacrifice to protect what's important? What will they do to procure their freedom? Unable to ever "prove" a concept of God or the laws that would come from him, will they nevertheless accept these things on faith, or will they go their own way? It's "the biblical story," said Cuse, "you have to take it on faith." He did pause, though, and reflect that the pursuit of truth is central to all religions, not just Christianity…

Now About That Scene from the Finale...

Man, did they end the evening on a high note. Here's what happened in the scene as best I can recall...

Locke is staring down the well noting that Desmond is not there. Sawyer is spying on him from the bushes. Ben gets the drop on Sawyer from behind and forces him at gunpoint over to the well.