Jonathan Edwards once wrote, “All that is ever spoken of in the Scripture as an ultimate end of God’s works is included in that one phrase, the glory of God.” With that one statement Edwards launched the publishing career of John Piper and summarized the crux of Protestant theology.

God is glorified in the creation of His people: “I will say to the north, ‘Give them up!’ And to the south, ‘Do not hold them back.’ Bring My sons from afar and My daughters from the ends of the earth, Everyone who is called by My name, And whom I have created for My glory, Whom I have formed, even whom I have made” (Isaiah 43:6-7). God is glorified in salvation of His people: For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; 9 not as a result of works, so that no one may boast (Ephesians 2:8-9).  

God is glorified in the lives of His people: “Let your light shine before men in such a way that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven” (Matthew 5:16).

 

God is glorified in the preservation of His people: The Lord will rescue me from every evil deed, and will bring me safely to His heavenly kingdom; to Him be the glory forever and ever. Amen (2 Timothy 4:18).

 

God does what He does in the way that He does so that He will receive all the glory: Not to us, O Lord, not to us, But to Your name give glory Because of Your lovingkindness, because of Your truth (Psalm 115:1).

 

Our thoughts and our doctrines reveal what we think about God. Our theology ought to reflect the centrality of God and His glory.