Okay, men, when we were 4, we all wanted to be superheroes. If someone asked you what you wanted to be when you grew up, you said “superhero.” Maybe a superhero to you at that time was a policeman, or fireman, or soldier (which at that age, we  intriguingly called "armyman"), but if you were like me, and my sons, you actually named a super hero (Batman (my favorite), Spiderman, or even Superman!).  Some just said “a superhero.”

We all knew that we wanted to make the world a better and safer place for everyone else.

Then someone convinced us that we weren’t superheroes.

My first son wore a cape for a couple of years. When anyone asked him why he wore the cape, he would look at them like they were a little thick in the head and say “Because I am a superhero.” I think he thought wearing the cape should have made that obvious enough. And I was amazed that there were friends, family, and even strangers who thought it was their job to make sure he knew that he wasn’t really a superhero! 

I defy them. I stand against the idea that we cannot be superheroes. 

As my son figured out, real superheroes may not wear capes, but they exist. Superheroes exist. People who make the world a better place for those within their sphere of influence do exist! 

In fact, I side with Smalley and Trent (from their book, The Hidden Value of a Man) that we are superheroes to our families and friends whether we believe so or not… or at least as powerful as one in their lives. When we live in denial of that fact, we are as dangerous as Superman in denial of the fact that he is anything more than Clark Kent. Clark Kent, in that state, is a walking disaster area – even the simplest activity would carry huge ramifications! When he merely tries to slap his alarm clock, he smashed the whole bedside table; when he yells at his son, he blows out the windows along the block as well as every family member’s eardrums.

So, if we carry so much consequence, than we had better know how to aim that power and submit it properly. We can be superheroes; in fact, we better remember that we are. As Uncle Ben told Peter Parker – “With great power comes great responsibility.” If you are a man, you are powerful. If you know that you are a male, but aren’t confident in the idea that you are a MAN, there will be an article or two on that coming, please be patient.

Men, we are heroes. God has made us powerful. We are superheroes. Let us wake up to the truth of it and embrace it. Buy a cape if you have to.