You probably don't want to read one more article on the religious liberty, cake-baking, gay marriage controversy. But let me diverge from the important legal and spiritual implications of this discussion and talk about the actual discussion itself. How should the discussion among Christians be driven around the public water cooler of social media? Here are a few thoughts I have in the wake of this pitched battle: 

  • We should always assume the very best about those with whom we disagree and we should argue against their best arguments, not caricatured straw men. 
  • We should remember that there are actual people behind the avatars. And we should remember that we are people, not avatars. As followers of Jesus we are accountable for what we do and say. 
  • We should not assume the headline, but understand and know the facts behind the headline. Tweeting in reaction to a headline may be fashionable, but it's not worthy of a Christian whose goal is to pursue truth (Philippines 4:8)
  • As much as we can, we should not talk at people, but with people. 
  • We should remember that if someone disagrees with us, they are not necessarily being mean to us, they are simply disagreeing with us. The surest way to shut down a productive discussion is to score cheap political points by hi-lighting how unreasonable our debate partner is. A reasoned argument against your position is not an attack. Know the difference. 
  • Christians should, as much as they can, support fellow Christians. Paul reminded us to do good to those who are of "the household of faith." Twisting the arguments, fanning the flames of public shame, and advancing the popular narrative of Christians as bigoted, uncaring, ideologues doesn't exactly build unity in the body of Christ. If anything discouraged me in this entire discussion it's the willingness of Christians to throw other Christians under the bus for fifteen seconds of cultural affirmation. Sad. 
  • It's helpful not to throw a rhetorical bomb out there and then say, "What?, What?" denying an obvious intention to stir things up (Proverbs 26:18-19)
  • It's also not helpful to come in late to an important discussion with the pious, "I wish Christians would all stop arguing and get in a circle and sing Kumbaya." Not every argument is worth having, yes. And sometimes Christians fight unworthy fights, yes. But not every discussion is unhealthy. Until we are fully sanctified in Heaven, we'll not stop having discussions and disagreements. 
  • We should discern between worthy arguments with reasonable opponents and folks who only want a prolonged Twitter battle. Or as a friend tells me all the time: Don't feed the trolls. It's also helpful to actually not be a troll. Twitter discipline is a hard thing to maintain and all of us have had moments where we have failed. 
  • We should be joyful warriors. There are slippery slopes, troubling signs in our culture, and an increasing marginalizing of orthodox Christian beliefs. Still, Christ is coming. He is building His Church. He is triumphant. And He will renew all things. So onward with joy.