Last Saturday I wrote a few words in praise of corn on the cob. I was pleased with myself until I received this note from my cousin Susan:

 

This is not debate, just general information.  Corn is delicious no matter how it is prepared.  I feel that on the cob, in its natural state, is yummy but the easy way out.  On the other hand, when you cut off the kernels (and they fly all over the kitchen) and then you scrape the corn milk off the cob and it decorates the kitchen walls, you really feel as though the mess that has been made is nothing in comparison to the wonderful taste after being cooked in a cast iron skillet with some butter and cream, a little salt and pepper.  I think it might be a little glimpse of Heaven.  I hope there will be abundant corn up there but I also hope I will be able to eat my fill of it with all that butter and not worry about heart disease and extra pounds.  I would assume that years ago when Mama Pritchard was making corn, she wasn't having to think about fat and cholesterol, but was thinking about preparing a delicious feast for her family!  And I thank her for that and for the  heritage of corn and all the ways it can be prepared!!!!! 

I happily bow to my cousin's superior knowledge because I can barely cook corn on the cob, but that's about it. She's absolutely right about Mama Pritchard and the feast she would prepare for whoever came to the farm outside Oxford, Mississippi where she and Papa Pritchard raised up a family of good eaters. That's where I learned to love sweet corn and fried okra, two dishes that we will definitely have in heaven and we won't have to worry about cholesterol or calories or gaining too much weight. You may think I'm making that up, but I'm not. One of the most familiar biblical images of heaven is the great feast in the Father's house (Luke 13:29). I don't think we'll have to worry about counting calories or points.

On July 1, Harvest House released my newest book, The Healing Power of Forgiveness.)


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