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Jim Daly Christian Blog and Commentary

Would You Take Friends on Your Honeymoon?

  • Jim Daly
    Jim Daly
    Jim Daly is president of Focus on the Family and host of its National Radio Hall of Fame-honored daily broadcast, heard by more than 2.9 million listeners a week on more than 1,000 radio stations across the U.S. He is husband to Jean and father to Trent and Troy. Jim's Focus on the Family Blog
  • 2012 Aug 16
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Posted by Jim_Daly Aug 15, 2012

According to a recent article in The New York Times, more and more couples are bringing their friends and even their parents on their honeymoon. In fact, there’s even a newly coined term for the practice:honeymoon3.jpg

The Buddymoon.

To borrow Dave Barry’s famous phrase, “No, I’m not making this up.”

Interestingly, though, it’s the newly married couple who are instigating the extended celebration with family and friends.

With cohabitation on the rise, a special romantic getaway for the newlyweds doesn’t quite have the same draw. Said one couple, “The whole flying off, and it just being the two of you — the novelty is sort of gone. It’s more of a novelty to have all those people together.”

Jean and I would actually have benefited from having a “buddymoon” thanks to the fact that both of us took turns falling violently ill upon arrival at our hotel. It would have been nice to have so many people to nurse us back to health!

In all sincerity, the whole concept strikes me as something of an unfortunate commentary on just one of the many consequences of pre-marital sex.

But assuming a couple is committed to abstaining from relations prior to marriage, how does this trend or practice strike you? To be fair, one of the rationales does contain some logic. It is a rare treat to have so many loved ones gathered together in one place, and for a happy occasion, no less.  Why not maximize that time together, so goes the theory.

Yet - is it wise or ultimately detrimental to the first days of marriage?

I’d like to hear from you. Would you take your friends or parents on your honeymoon? 

Would you agree to be a “buddy” – or does that take the “honey” out of the “moon”?

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