The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the One and Only who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.
 
John 1:14

"Everyone has a story to tell."

I have heard, seen and read this statement many times in the past year. In the pulpit, in books and on-screen. 

On of those times was in the over-the-top movie australia, the Baz Luhrmann epic starring Hugh Jackman and Nicole Kidman. Jackman's character, Drover, says this in reference to the process of finding out who you are. He implies that in order to have a story, you have to live, take risks and discover what makes you YOU. 

Our stories are what we share with others. And to them we say:  "This is my story.  This is who I am."

I also have heard a pastor reference our individual stories at church during a sermon series. In his case, though, he discussed the shepherds in Luke 2:8 and what story they had to tell:

And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, "Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger."

Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying, "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men on whom his favor rests."

When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, "Let's go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about."

So they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger. When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child, and all who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart. The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told.

The shepherds sought what they had heard about. They wanted to discover more about this baby, this Christ. And when they did, they didn't sit on what they had experienced. They didn't keep their story hidden from their daily lives or in their interactions with others.

No, they LIVED this story! They were "glorifying" and "praising" God for what they had heard and seen. The greatest story ever told had now become their story.

I was really challenged while hearing the pastor preach through this passage in Luke, because I have a story, too. When I was three years old, my life took an entirely new direction. It was then that I understood what Christ had done for me. I accepted him into my life, and he took over and began writing my story. He is the author of my life, and it is he who has made it more satisfying than I could have ever imagined.

Each day, you and I have the opportunity to share the stories of our lives with others. If we have given our lives to Christ, then we must tell them that Jesus is Lord. He is the One, the Savior, the Divine Rescuer! And this is why we celebrate his coming to earth. It is Good News! And as we surrender to him, we yield our lives so that he may write our stories.

Intersecting Faith & Life: 

Choose one person with whom you will share your story this week or sometime this month. Schedule a time over coffee or a meal when you can meet and speak from your heart. Tell him or her what makes you YOU and what Christ has done in your life's story.

Further Reading:

Mark 16:15

2 Timothy 1:8