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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Concussions Increase Risk of Teen Suicide

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2014 Apr 22
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In addition to hindering cognitive function, concussions can also increase suicidal tendencies in teenagers, according to a new study.

Lead study author Dr. Gabriela Ilie, a post-doctoral fellow at St. Michael's Hospital, said he discovered that teens who suffered a traumatic brain injury, including a concussion, were at "significantly greater odds" of attempting suicide. They were also at an increased risk of being bully or engaging in different high-risk behaviors.

The study results showed that teens who had suffered from a concussion were more likely to engage in risky behaviors, including drug use, drinking and driving and potentially using a deadly weapon.

"These results show that preventable brain injuries and mental health and behavioral problems among teens continue to remain a blind spot in our culture," Ilie said, via a press release. "These kids are falling through the cracks."

For the study, researchers used data from the 2011 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey that was developed by the Center for Addiction and Mental Health. The survey contains information from almost 9,000 students from grades 7 to 12 in publicly funded schools across Ontario. The OSDUHS began as a drug use survey but also ran broader to incorporate questions about traumatic brain injury.

The study appeared in the online journal PLOS ONE.

Source: ScienceWorldReport
http://www.scienceworldreport.com/articles/14029/20140415/concussions-among-teen-may-increase-their-risk-of-suicide.htm