A new study refutes earlier suggestions that the amount of time spent on Facebook and other social media sites might lead to depression.

Researchers believe it may be unnecessarily alarming to advise patients and parents on the risk of “Facebook Depression” based solely on the amount of Internet use.

The results of the study by The University of Wisconsin researchers are published online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

The new report counters last year’s American Academy of Pediatrics study that suggested exposure to Facebook could lead to depression.

In the new study, students were surveyed with 43 text-message questionnaires at random intervals over a seven-day period between February and December of 2011.

Evaluation of the data, including the depression-screening results, discovered no significant associations between social-media use and the probability of depression.

“The findings have important implications for clinicians who may prematurely alarm parents about social-media use and depression risks," said Lauren Jelenchick, one of the leading researchers involved in the study.

Source: PsychCentral
http://psychcentral.com/news/2012/07/10/facebook-activity-does-not-lead-to-depression/41399.html