Crosswalk.com aims to offer the most compelling biblically-based content to Christians on their walk with Jesus. Crosswalk.com is your online destination for all areas of Christian Living – faith, family, fun, and community. Each category is further divided into areas important to you and your Christian faith including Bible study, daily devotions, marriage, parenting, movie reviews, music, news, and more.

Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Google: Your Teen's New Sex Ed Teacher

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2011 Jun 07
  • Comments

This isn't surprising, but should be a reminder to parents that being intentional with ongoing discussions about sex and sexuality with your kids is a far better approach than leaving their sex education up to circumstance, chance and Google.

The web has also taken on another role: that of teacher. Recent studies indicate that most teens turn to search engines (and most popularly Google) as their primary choice to find out information about sex and sex-related topics.

This information comes from a focus group study known as “TECHsexUSA” done by ISIS.  The study looked at teens from the ages of 13 to 19, and asked questions related to finding sex-related information. Responses to questions about how sexual health issues and sexual questions were addressed included, “First thing, I Google” and, “I don’t use technology. I just Google.” Common questions typed into the search engines included how to avoid pregnancy, how to avoid STIs and STDs, how to get rid of hickeys, how to find free condoms, and how to behave appropriately with sex.

Different age groups and genders seemed to have different focuses. Women were three times more likely than men to be interested in issues of birth control and 33% more likely to be concerned with STIs. Men, especially in the younger group, were more concerned with the technical details of sex and understanding certain sexual behaviors such as oral sex.

Source: Search Engine Journal
http://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-your-teens-new-sex-ed-teacher/30312