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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Here Comes "The Hunger Games"

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2012 Mar 21
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With so much breathless anticipation awaiting the release of The Hunger Games this Friday, lost in the shuffle may be whether the film, based on Suzanne Collins’ wildly popular young-adult novel, is actually appropriate for young adults. The core story, after all, is 24 teenage kids literally killing each other as a brutal national television spectacle.

Yet, the movie only gets a PG-13 rating. Great for the boxoffice, but maybe not for the kids. So, what's a parent to do?

Common Sense Media, the independent, not-for-profit, non-partisan group that has been rating films’ appropriateness since 2003, gives The Hunger Games a "Pause 13+." What's this mean? “When we rate something ‘pause,’ it’s really a know-your-kids situation,” said CSM managing editor Betsy Bozdech. “It’s iffy for the age, but some 13-year-olds may be able to handle it, and some may not. You need to know your kid and your family and take it from there. We all have vivid imaginations, that’s for sure, but it’s very different to see a kid spearing another one, breaking another one’s neck, smashing their head in, than it is to read about it. It’s just a more visceral experience.”

For parents who allow their children to see The Hunger Games, Bozdech sees the film as a fabulous conversation starter for families.

Source: Inside Movies
http://insidemovies.ew.com/2012/03/20/hunger-games-common-sense-media/