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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Olympic Village Secret: Cold Days, Hot Nights

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2010 Feb 19
  • Comments

Ughhh. Athletes staying at the Olympic Village for the Vancouver games also get the equivalent of 14 condoms per person. Wow. Perhaps Olympic athletes should receive some abstinence training along with their athletic training...

It may be the most exclusive neighborhood in the world. Money can't buy a room there: The only currency accepted is supreme athletic talent.

It's the Olympic Village, and its residents are the strongest, fastest, most competitive and most confident men and women in the world. Scattered among this population of athletic heroes are the greatest champions from across the globe, people who have won multiple Olympic medals and world titles and dominate their sports.

The citizens of the village are young, remarkably healthy, and the definition of physically attractive. In such an environment, flirting is as natural as breathing.

Inevitably, some athletes get beyond flirting. That's why the Vancouver organizers have laid in a stock of 100,000 condoms, which works out to 14 for each of the 7,000 athletes, coaches, trainers and officials housed in the Games' two villages. (Apparently, skiing, skating and sliding aren't the only activities at which Olympians excel.)

Too many perhaps? Lots of leftover surplus stock? Apparently not. The distribution of free condoms at the Olympics goes back at least to 1992 and Barcelona. In 2000, Sydney organizers thought that 70,000 would be enough. They were wrong and had to send out for 20,000 more.

Source: Today / MSNBC
http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/35439222/ns/today-today_in_vancouver