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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Parents' Sex Talk with Kids: Too Little, Too Late

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2009 Dec 08
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Another reminder that parents should make talking to their kids about sexuality a priority -- and an ongoing discussion -- rather than having "the talk." Jim Burns, President of HomeWord, has recently released the "Pure Foundations" series of resources to help parents address this need throughout their childrens' stages of development. Click here to check out these resources.

The sex talk is never easy. It's not comfortable for anyone involved — parents are afraid of it, children are mortified by it — which is probably why the talk so often comes after the fact. In the latest study on parent-child talks about sex and sexuality, researchers found that more than 40% of adolescents had had intercourse before talking to their parents about safe sex, birth control or sexually transmitted diseases.

That trend is troublesome, say experts, since teens who talk to their parents about sex are more likely to delay their first sexual encounter and to practice safe sex when they do become sexually active. And, ironically, despite their apparent dread, kids really want to learn about sex from their parents, according to study after study on the topic.

Source: Time
http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1945759,00.html?xid=rss-topstories