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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Stupid Teenage Tricks, for a Virtual Audience

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2010 Jun 15
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A fascinating blog post appears in the New York Times which ponders the question of whether teenagers are prone to take more risks today for the purpose of filming their antics and posting them to YouTube or Facebook. Given the lack of research into the matter, it can't yet be determined whether or not kids really are taking more risks or if it's just easier for teens to capture their antics on video for posting on the Internet. Either way, it's a good idea for parents to be aware of the trend.

Is the Internet making teenagers do more dumb things than ever?

Some child specialists worry that it is. Teenagers have always been prone to taking foolish risks (thanks partly to the brain's prefrontal cortex, which governs decision-making and is still developing in adolescence). But with the rise of sites like YouTube and Facebook, these experts say, teenagers now face virtual peer pressure to emulate all kinds of dangerous stunts and dares, and post them online.

There are no data to demonstrate whether Web-inspired recklessness is really increasing or whether teenagers are taking the same risks as earlier generations — and just finding it easier to document idiotic exploits for all to see.

But some doctors say that at the very least, the Internet is causing adolescents to ratchet up the danger level. A few weeks ago, Dr. E. Hani Mansour, a burn specialist in Livingston, N.J., treated a teenager who had been severely burned after lighting fireworks. This was not your father's fireworks accident. The boy had filled the family bathtub with fireworks, covered his body in protective clothing and set up a video camera to record the event. The resulting explosion, which the teenager later said he had hoped to post on YouTube, created a fireball that left the boy with burns on about 14 percent of his body.

"Boys have been trying to be rocket scientists for many years," said Dr. Mansour, medical director of the burn center at St. Barnabas Medical Center. "But now we're seeing it in a more brazen way. They're doing it for the purpose of filming it."

Source: New York Times
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/14/teens-take-high-risks-for-a-virtual-audience/