Those who oppose Christians, and fear their influence in the affairs of our nation, tend to raise one of two arguments. First, we're told, the majority of America's founders and framers were "deists," not Christians..."and that's a well-known fact." Truth is, the most influential patriots were anything but "deists," however you may choose to define that word. Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Madison, Paine, Hamilton--hardly "deist". And if one begins to survey the signers of our Constitution, well...the number of pastors and evangelical Christians among the signatories would make even Bill Maher blush. That is, if he remembers how.     

As for those who argue against America as a "Christian" nation merely because there is no religious "litmus test" for citizenship is to create a false dichotomy. Truly, one needs not believe in Christ to declare as an American. Such requirements are better-suited to places like Saudi Arabia, where only Muslims are permitted entrance to the city of Mecca. But to then deny the unmistakable imprimatur of faith our laws and traditions reflect, and to miss the clear references and appeals to God in the majority (not a cherry-picked minority) of public statements made by our founders and framers would indicate either a strong prejudice, or a limited grasp of American history.

What is disheartening is how those who clearly commuinicate their Christian faith are instantly marginalized by their unbelieving friends. These Christ-followers' logical and rational arguments are dismissed by those who find reason and faith to be incompatible. But why? That line of thinking is the very essence of intolerance, and only defines the limitations of non-theistic intellect.