They are everywhere: dangling from limbs, nettled in shrubs, sprouting from grass, blowing across your driveway, maybe even clinging to your shoe laces. Seeds are so commonplace and visually unexceptional that we are hardly aware of them, even less of what they contain.

 

Most are no larger than a small pebble and appear lifeless and inert. But unlike a pebble that will forever be a pebble, a seed carries a blueprint and library of instructions that enable it to become a thing rivaling the complexity of a Nissan factory.

With just a little water a chemical switch is flipped, launching the assembly of molecular machines that churn out functional parts, complete with routing instructions for the manufacture of cells that will become a bloom of an unnoticed clover or the trunk of a towering Sequoia, a nourishing pear or poisonous hemlock, a scruffy sage bush or elegant orchid, each with the ability to multiply and “fill the earth,” according to its in-built design.

Imagine burying a piece of scrap metal and returning six months later to find an automobile assembly plant making its own parts, repairing its own equipment, turning out cars, and spawning other factories, all without human assistance. What happens with a seed is no less astounding.

Seeds are wondrous evidences of Design, and so vital to life on planet Earth, that a global “seed vault” was established in 2008. Fixed in the permafrost of Norway, the vault is designed to preserve over 2 billion varieties of seeds that would be needed to replenish the earth’s flora in the case of a worldwide disaster.

Yet life-essential seeds are also held in another vault, one much older and more secure -- the pages of Scripture. Jesus unlocks the vault with a group of parables in the fourth chapter of Mark. Continue reading here.