Two weeks ago, 23 South Korean Christian missionaries were kidnapped by the Taliban in Afghanistan. So far, two have been shot to death, slaughtered to intimidate South Korea into withdrawing from troops from the Middle East. The rest are up for ransom. Why is the human rights community and American media largely ignoring the situation?

In an article yesterday on National Review, columnist Michelle Malkin writes:

Across Asia, media coverage is 24/7. Strangers have held nightly prayer vigils. But the human-rights crowd in America has been largely AWOL. And so has most of our mainstream media. Among some of the secular elite, no doubt, is a blame-the-victim apathy: The missionaries deserved what they got. What were they thinking bringing their message of faith to a war zone? Didn’t they know they were sitting ducks for Muslim head-choppers whose idea of evangelism is “convert or die”?

Read her article: Silently Martyred

Most of these hostages, Malkin notes, are female nurses who traveled to Afghanistan to provide social services and medical relief. “They were peaceful believers in Christ on short-term medical and humanitarian missions.”

The latest from Fox News: South Korean Envoy to Meet Taliban Kidnappers

The latest from CNN yesterday: Families losing hope for hostages

Read the Crosswalk features on the situation:

Taliban Executes 2nd Korean Captive - Baptist Press

South Korea Rethinks Mission Strategy - ASSIST News Service

Update: Taliban Kill One Korean Hostage, Set Final Deadline  - Crosswalk.com

Taliban Threatens to Kill South Korean Missionaries - ASSIST News Service