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Stephen McGarvey Christian Blog and Commentary

Phony Peaceniks

  • Stephen McGarvey
    Stephen McGarvey is the Executive Editor of Crosswalk.com and Christianity.com for the Salem Web Network. He is a World Journalism Institute fellow and has previously worked for BreakPoint with Chuck Colson, and the Home School Legal Defense Association. His articles have appeared in several publications including WORLD, The Washington Times, byFaith, BreakPoint WorldView, and the Union Leader (Manchester, NH).
  • 2005 Oct 05
  • Comments

They would have you believe the are only anti-war. They are the professional protestors who recently returned to Washington to raise a stink about everything that's wrong with the Bush Administration. Yet as Slate has the moxie to point out, these groups are not just opposed to the war in Iraq, they are supported by the enemies of America:

The group self-lovingly calling itself "United for Peace and Justice" is by no means "narrow" in its "antiwar focus" but rather represents a very extended alliance between the Old and the New Left, some of it honorable and some of it redolent of the World Youth Congresses that used to bring credulous priests and fellow-traveling hacks together to discuss "peace" in East Berlin or Bucharest. Just to give you an example, from one who knows the sectarian makeup of the Left very well, I can tell you that the Worker's World Party, Ramsey Clark's core outfit, is the product of a split within the Trotskyist movement. These were the ones who felt that the Trotskyist majority, in 1956, was wrong to denounce the Russian invasion of Hungary.

Doesn't sound too peaceful to me. Writer Christopher Hitchens continues:

To be against war and militarism, in the tradition of Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht, is one thing. But to have a record of consistent support for war and militarism, from the Red Army in Eastern Europe to the Serbian ethnic cleansers and the Taliban, is quite another.

Then why does the press continue to treat these protestors like heroes of freedom?

It is really a disgrace that the liberal press refers to such enemies of liberalism as "antiwar" when in reality they are straight-out pro-war, but on the other side. Was there a single placard saying, "No to Jihad"? Of course not. Or a single placard saying, "Yes to Kurdish self-determination" or "We support Afghan women's struggle"? Don't make me laugh. And this in a week when Afghans went back to the polls, and when Iraqis were preparing to do so, under a hail of fire from those who blow up mosques and U.N. buildings, behead aid workers and journalists, proclaim fatwahs against the wrong kind of Muslim, and utter hysterical diatribes against Jews and Hindus.

No one would ever accuse Slate of being a conservative publication. Far from it. Kudos to Hitchens for having the courage to point out the truth when the rest of the mainstream media refuses to dig beneath the surface.

 

Read the complete article:  Anti-War, My Foot: The phony peaceniks who protested in Washington.