One of David's close friends, Asaph asked the same question that you have in Psalms 73  Asaph was a cymbal player who was promoted to directing one of the 24 temple choruses who ultimately became the chief of sacred music.

He was frustrated and distressed when he looked around and realized that many ungodly people were enjoying life to the fullest while he wasn't getting along so well.

Many Christians struggle with this dilemma. Here you trust God and you look around and see a lost man with a new house when your roof is falling in. Their kids have two or three pairs of shoes, and you can hardly afford one! Others get promotions and you're out of work!

You know the feeling, B; you are trying to live a godly life while your adulterous husband is in your bed with his mistress.

Let me tell you how Asaph dealt with the same issue. This won't solve all your problems or answer all of your questions, but it will give you a sense of understanding and hope.

He had been taught that God was good to the upright and pure in heart, that God cared for His children, but that didn't coincide with his experience. Like you, it seemed to him like the wicked he knew were prospering and he was having troubles.

Let me walk you through Psalm 73 to see how he handled his disillusionment and disgust--and ultimately found satisfaction and peace.

Surely God is good to Israel, to those who are pure in heart.

But as for me, my feet had almost slipped;
I had nearly lost my foothold.
For I envied the arrogant
when I saw the prosperity of the wicked.

They have no struggles;
their bodies are healthy and strong.
They are free from common human burdens;
they are not plagued by human ills….
This is what the wicked are like—
always free of care, they go on amassing wealth.

Surely in vain I have kept my heart pure
and have washed my hands in innocence. (Psalm 73:1-5, 13).

Does Asaph sound like you, or what!? You might consider that God wrote a Psalm 73 just for you!

Asaph was distressed. Just like you, B. He had been taught that God was good to the upright and pure in heart, that God cared for His children, but that didn't coincide with his experience. It seemed like the wicked he knew were prospering and he was having troubles.

Asaph then focused on himself. He is disappointed, discouraged and in despair. You feel his despair, don't you? Just like you. You're discouraged and disappointed at how God is allowing your husband to flourish while you fail.

Asaph couldn't change the circumstances; but, he could change his thinking and perspective. When he went to church, when he entered into the presence of God, everything looked different.

When I tried to understand all this,
it troubled me deeply
till I entered the sanctuary of God;
then I understood their final destiny.

Surely you place them on slippery ground;
you cast them down to ruin.
How suddenly are they destroyed,
completely swept away by terrors
They are like a dream when one awakes;
when you arise, Lord,
you will despise them as fantasies. (Psalm 73:16-20).

In God's presence Asaph saw some additional facts that he hadn't noticed before. I will speak to this from the perspective of you and your husband.

Your husband won't get away with his behavior forever.

He is standing in a slippery place and will soon slip and slide in failure and misery.

Living outside of God's will, your husband will face an uncertain future that will result in fear and terror.