Author: Lynette Eason
Title: A Killer Among Us
Publisher: Revell

One might think a woman who is a top-notch hostage negotiator—trained to read people, diffuse tense situations, and pick her way through a minefield of emotions with lives at stake—would find personal relationships a snap. One would be wrong. At least, that’s the case for Detective Kit Kenyon.

That’s too bad, because her new partner is definitely interesting ... and quite possibly interested.

Noah is a good cop and an authentic Christian. He’s a godly guy in the best possible sense—not so perfect as to be nauseating, but appealing enough that he’ll have single female readers praying they’ll meet a real life version. (Of course, the fact that he’s hot and can take down bad guys might factor into his charm just a tiny bit.) Noah’s last partner—also a woman—came to a bad end, so he’s not sure he’s ready to team up professionally with anyone, least of all an attractive woman. It’s three weeks into their working relationship and they’re off to a rocky start.

But the tension between them is nothing compared to the stress they’re about to be under: there’s a serial killer on the loose. The self-styled “Judge” is handing out punishment for offenses and the verdict is always the death penalty. To make things worse, some of the victims are high-profile and the District Attorney is breathing down Kit and Noah’s necks. Or is the DA more involved than he first appears ... and not in his official capacity? They’d better find out, and fast—the bodies are starting to pile up.

While the identity of the killer should come as no surprise (especially to Hitchcock fans) that doesn’t take away from the suspense, and may even increase it. We periodically see through the Judge’s eyes; his insane but weirdly rational reasoning adds nicely to the creepy factor. That’s especially true when we learn the Judge’s plans for Kit and Noah.

As if that wasn’t enough, Kit has family issues to deal with. On his deathbed, her father spilled a secret: Kit was adopted at birth. Since then she moved closer to her birth family and is slowly getting to know them, but she’s still mad at her adopted mom for not telling her. She’s pretty ticked off at God, too. It will take a lot of blood, sweat, and tears (literally on all counts) before she realizes, “Family’s not just made up of people who share the same blood, it’s made up of people who love you.”

Kit’s sisters also work in law enforcement—must be a family thing—and were the subjects of Lynette Eason’s previous installments in her Women of Justice series. While A Killer Among Us stands on its own, most readers will probably want to take in the rest of the series as well for the pleasure of getting to know the whole family. If you’re looking for well-written romantic suspense that honors God, you’ll find it in A Killer Among Us.