DVD Release Date: September 4, 2012
Theatrical Release Date: April 27, 2012
Rating: R (for sexual content, and language throughout)
Genre: Comedy, Romance
Run Time: 124 min.
Director: Nicholas Stoller
Actors: Jason Segel, Emily Blunt, Chris Pratt, Alison Brie, Rhys Ifans

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following review contains discussion of mature subject matter and is not suitable for young readers. Parents please be advised.

Before getting into the plot, the acting, and so on, there is something you should know up front: when you see the words “this film is rated R for sexual content and language throughout,” they are not kidding.

Is it a funny movie? In many places, yes, it is absolutely hilarious. Does it have some sweet, romantic moments? Indeed it does, the kind that make you go “Awwwww.” But if you consider profanity, ongoing conversations about sex, and several scenes that are just this side of pornography to be unacceptable viewing, you don’t need to read any further: this film is not for you.

It starts so well, too, with an adorable proposal scene complete with fireworks and a killer view of San Francisco. Tom (Jason Segel, The Muppets) and Violet (Emily Blunt, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen) seem to be the perfect couple, headed toward the perfect wedding and perfect life. Sure, there’s a little hiccup when Tom’s goofy best friend Alex (Chris Pratt, Moneyball) knocks up Violet’s sister, Suzie (Alison Brie, Scream 4), but once those two are married there’s nothing to stand in between our heroes and wedded bliss. Tom, a sous chef in a top San Fran restaurant, is headed toward culinary stardom; Violet will soon be accepted into a local program and become a respected psychologist.

Except she doesn’t. Her offer is for a two-year program at the University of Michigan. Tom gives up his career to go with her (it’s just two years; he can cook anywhere) and suddenly finds himself irrelevant. Most romantic comedy plots hinge on some kind of communication breakdown and this is no exception. Tom feels emasculated by his new life in Michigan but he refuses to admit there’s a problem, taking out his aggression on not-very-realistic-looking deer (in hunting season).

Following stereotypical lines, Violet’s college advisor has no morals whatsoever. How on earth has this man avoided sexual harassment charges? Naturally, he comes between the couple, telling Violet, “It’s OK to be selfish, you’re a good person.” Seriously? What kind of twisted logic is that? It’s just one more example of the lack of respect shown by almost everyone to almost everyone. Tom’s mother even cusses out her son over breakfast. Is it supposed to be funny to show a sophisticated older woman with a potty mouth?