Crosswalk.com aims to offer the most compelling biblically-based content to Christians on their walk with Jesus. Crosswalk.com is your online destination for all areas of Christian Living – faith, family, fun, and community. Each category is further divided into areas important to you and your Christian faith including Bible study, daily devotions, marriage, parenting, movie reviews, music, news, and more.

Intersection of Life and Faith

"Exodus" - Music Review

  • Anthony DeBarros Music Reviewer
  • 2003 1 Jan
  • COMMENTS
"Exodus" - Music Review

Artist:    Plus One
Label:   Inpop Records

When word spread that Plus One was trading its boy-band moves for modern-rock street-cred, more than one Internet chat pundit wondered if the band could pull it off — not that too many necessarily disagreed with the idea. After all, the whole boy-band thing has followed ska into the land of yesterday’s trends, so reaching for rock integrity seemed like a smart choice. But could the guys pull it off?

Turns out, they can. Now a threesome — with Nate Cole, Gabe Combs and Nathan Walters — the new Plus One bears only a passing resemblance to the vocal group that debuted in 2000 with "The Promise" (Atlantic). Absent from the mix are all the pretty, quivering harmonies and computer-generated music. In their place are rock guitars and the band’s smart songwriting, bolstered by crisp production, courtesy of Newsboys' Peter Furler and Jeff Frankenstein.

The result is a bonafide rock album — and a pretty good one, too. Much of "Exodus" offers poppier rock à la Lifehouse (“Tonight”) or the latest installment of FFH (the piano-driven “Outlaw”). And when the band drops in a song like “Poor Man,” you know its metamorphosis is cemented. Built on heavily fuzzed guitars, the chorus pounds with the brute-force ethos you’d expect from, say, Kutless.

Cole aptly handles lead vocals and thankfully minimizes the vibrato boy-band nuances. Meanwhile, the songs focus on overcoming through love (“Be Love”), deliverance (“Exodus”) or protection (“Sea of Angels”). The only distraction is an unremarkable cover of “Here I Am to Worship,” which could have used a more creative re-visioning. Nevertheless, Plus One has pulled off a big change with style and substance — a rare accomplishment. 


© 2003 CCM Magazine.  All rights reserved.  Used with permission.  Click here to subscribe.