Crosswalk.com aims to offer the most compelling biblically-based content to Christians on their walk with Jesus. Crosswalk.com is your online destination for all areas of Christian arts and culture. You will also find other great resources on topics such as Bible study, Bible verses, marriage, parenting, movie reviews, music, news, and more.

Christian Art and Culture

Narnia or Neverland?

  • Daniel Burke Religion News Service
  • 2012 4 Apr
  • COMMENTS
Narnia or Neverland?

(RNS) -- Evangelicals prefer Narnia, Catholics have a wanderlust for Wonderland, and mainline Protestants are split between hitching a ride to Hogwarts, Narnia or Neverland.

Those are the results from a unique poll by the television show 60 Minutes and Vanity Fair magazine. The survey asked 1,000 Americans what fantasy land they'd most like to visit (Washington, D.C., excluded).

Evangelicals showed a clear preference for Narnia, the fantastical world of talking beasts entered through a enchanted wardrobe in C.S. Lewis' series The Chronicles of Narnia.

Lewis, an Anglican, topped the list for 28 percent of evangelicals. Both his fiction -- commonly interpreted as Christian allegories -- and also his nonfiction have become touchstones in contemporary evangelicalism.

Just 8 percent of evangelicals said they would like to visit Hogwarts, the school of witchcraft and wizardry from the Harry Potter series.

Alice's Wonderland was many Catholics' cup of tea, with 21 percent saying they'd like to take a trip down the rabbit hole. Peter Pan's Neverland (18 percent), Hogwarts (18 percent) and J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle Earth (16 percent) weren't far behind.

Mainline Protestants were similarly split between Neverland (19 percent), Narnia (18 percent) and Hogwarts (18 percent).

Among those listed as "other" religions, Hogwarts was the clear favorite (31 percent). And Middle Earth led the way for those who professed no religious affiliation (23 percent).

The survey, conducted in late 2010 and recently highlighted by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University, includes a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

c. 2012 Religion News Service. Used with permission.