The Search for the Sacred

John 1:14

And the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us, and we saw His glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father, full of grace and truth.

Newsweek ran an article entitled, "The Search for the Sacred." It was a typical article, speaking of the search and longing for spiritual truth, without ever mentioning Jesus Christ.

What I found most fascinating—and heartbreaking at the same time—is the way people responded to the article in the "Letters to the Editor" section of the following issue:

My parents had open minds and allowed me to explore different teachings and beliefs, rather than stifling me or limiting me to any one path. I'm grateful for that. As a youth, I studied Greek mythology and I read Frazier's The Golden Bow. I then read the Bible from cover to cover after a near-death experience. I have spent my life examining various   philosophic and religious beliefs through independent study. And today, I have a deep and significant relationship with the god of my understanding.

This writer has obviously rejected the God of creation, having replaced Him with a god of her own creation. 

Another wrote:

Although I didn't consciously seek the sacred in my travels during the last five years, I found it—at dawn in the Hong Kong botanical gardens, observing the Chinese practice Tai Chi. I found it on a drizzly morning in a London church listening to a rehearsal of a Mozart selection. I found it at midday in an outdoor Hindu temple in Bali, and at night in the Karnak temple in Luxor, Egypt. I found it in all of those places.

I wouldn't want this person's blended religion, but I'd sure like to have his frequent flyer miles!

Yet another respondent made this complaint:

Tell me, when are we atheists going to get equal time? We don't lack inner strength, peace, identity, self-esteem, or a purpose for living. What we do lack is the need to lean on a crutch of a fantasy figure who will make everything alright [sic], who will take care of us and forgive us, no matter what we do. We lack the desire to have our lives and loves defined by a two-thousand-year-old collection of documents. Atheists don't have all the answers, but at least we know that the place to start looking is within oneself, not into the ozone.

Wow! We certainly live in a world searching for spirituality. And how do we know which religion is right? Plato, a renowned Greek philosopher, provided an answer somewhat accidentally when he wrote, "It may be that someday there will come forth from God a logos  [Word], who will reveal all mysteries and make everything plain."

My friends, Plato's desire has been answered!  John 1 says that the logos or Word from God came and revealed Himself to  mankind. That same Word died on our behalf so   we might be able to have a personal relationship with Him. Man's journey to search for God ends with . . . Jesus Christ.

Prayer Point: Ponder for a moment what an incredible privilege it is to know God and to be called His child. Then, thank Him for pursuing you, even to the point of death, and making it possible for you to know Him.

Extra Refreshment: Read John 1 and mark in your Bible the words that speak of God's revealing His truth to us through Christ (hint: came, dwelt, revealed).


More than a Story

Society is teaching our kids that the Bible is full of fairy tales. And if our kids haven’t started facing doubts yet, they most assuredly will once they reach high school and college. So how can we help them see, even at a young age, that the accounts in Scripture really are inspired by God? How can we give them a sense of wonder for God’s Word that will last beyond their Sunday school years? The answer lies in an empty tomb. 

Many ministries today expound on life and illustrate with Scripture;
we’re committed to expounding on Scripture and illustrating with life!