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<< Discover the Book, with Dr. John Barnett

Discover the Book - July 15, 2007

  • 2007 Jul 15
  • COMMENTS
 

David: How to Respond When Attacked,

Slandered and Painfully Abused

2 Samuel 16:1-14

Part 2 Continued from July 14th

 

 

 

Now as we go step by step through this sad and painful day we can mine 8 wonderful truths to live by when we also suffer abuse, attacks, and slander.

 

Look how God was glorified in David’s painful consequences.

 

  1. When David was at the bottom—God sent him help.

 

2 Samuel 15:19-21 Then the king said to Ittai the Gittite, “Why are you also going with us? Return and remain with the king. For you are a foreigner and also an exile from your own place. 20 In fact, you came only yesterday. Should I make you wander up and down with us today, since I go I know not where? Return, and take your brethren back. Mercy and truth be with you.” 21 But Ittai answered the king and said, “As the Lord lives, and as my lord the king lives, surely in whatever place my lord the king shall be, whether in death or life, even there also your servant will be.” NKJV

 

  1. When David was at his weakest point--he waits for God’s provision.

 

2 Samuel 15:25 Then the king said to Zadok, “Carry the ark of God back into the city. If I find favor in the eyes of the Lord, He will bring me back and show me both it and His dwelling place. NKJV

 

Note that David does not try to defend himself. David left his burdens with the Lord so he didn’t have to take matters into his own hands. Notice that David does not grasp things, even when they are rightfully his. That is the strength and serenity we can have from the Lord. It is unusual and magnificent to see such strength—for it only comes from the Lord!

 

David knew that the Lord was with him, he didn’t need a box covered with gold to remind him. He had the Lord Himself, so he was willing to leave the Ark in the Tent and go out of the city trusting in God and God alone.

 

  1. When David was at his lowest moment of his life--he bows and offered up a Psalm of praise to God.

 

2 Samuel 15:30, 32 So David went up by the Ascent of the Mount of Olives, and wept as he went up; and he had his head covered and went barefoot. And all the people who were with him covered their heads and went up, weeping as they went up. 32 Now it happened when David had come to the top of the mountain, where he worshiped God—there was Hushai the Archite coming to meet him with his robe torn and dust on his head. NKJV

 

God’s servants can continue in worship even when life is tough, difficult, and almost looking like it is impossible to go on. Turn with me to the exact record of the worship that flowed from David. This is what can flow from us if we like David—bow in worship when the bitter tears of sorrow and grief fall across our lives.

 

David trusted God’s control—even through bitter tears of sorrow and grief. He relied upon it and prayed for it. Instead of fear he had faith and gave worship.

 

  1. When David was least in control of his circumstances—he entrusts his situation to the Lord.

 

2 Samuel 15:31 Then someone told David, saying, “Ahithophel is among the conspirators with Absalom.” And David said, “O Lord, I pray, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness!” NKJV

 

People often share reports that can either lead us to fear or prompt us to prayer. David lifts his heart in prayer to the Lord at this evil report!

 

  1. When David was attacked—he realized that God allows adversaries for His own purposes.

 

2 Samuel 16:9-11 Then Abishai the son of Zeruiah said to the king, “Why should this dead dog curse my lord the king? Please, let me go over and take off his head!” 10 But the king said, “What have I to do with you, you sons of Zeruiah? So let him curse, because the Lord has said to him, ‘Curse David.’ Who then shall say, ‘Why have you done so?’ ” 11 And David said to Abishai and all his servants, “See how my son who came from my own body seeks my life. How much more now may this Benjamite? Let him alone, and let him curse; for so the Lord has ordered him. NKJV

 

He entrusts his personal adversaries to the Lord. David knew that God raises up and puts down. He knew adversaries were allowed by God—and he wanted to respond correctly! God often allows us to be attacked by various adversaries, just to reveal what is really in our hearts.

 

  1. When the painful abuse was overwhelming him--David fled to the Lord for hope.

 

2 Samuel 16:12 It may be that the Lord will look on my affliction, and that the Lord will repay me with good for his cursing this day.” NKJV

 

David knew God cared; he knew God saw his troubles. He knew that the Lord can cause all things to work together for good. He always entrusted his personal sufferings to the Lord.

 

  1. Even when David’s situation looked hopelessly impossible--God was managing everything.

 

Second Samuel 17:14 And Absalom and all the men of Israel said, The counsel of Hushai the Archite [is] better than the counsel of Ahithophel. For the LORD had appointed to defeat the good counsel of Ahithophel, to the intent that the LORD might bring evil upon Absalom. (KJV)

 

When we let God take care of us, and when we entrust our personal vengeance to the Lord—the Lord can do what we never could to remedy the situation. ‘Vengeance is mine saith the Lord’ (Hebrews 10:30). Allow the Lord to recompense your enemies. David had many enemies and adversaries, but he let the Lord deal with them all.

 

  1. At just the exact moment God planned--David’s needs are met.

 

2 Samuel 17:27-29 Now it happened, when David had come to Mahanaim, that Shobi the son of Nahash from Rabbah of the people of Ammon, Machir the son of Ammiel from Lo Debar, and Barzillai the Gileadite from Rogelim, 28 brought beds and basins, earthen vessels and wheat, barley and flour, parched grain and beans, lentils and parched seeds, 29 honey and curds, sheep and cheese of the herd, for David and the people who were with him to eat. For they said, “The people are hungry and weary and thirsty in the wilderness.” NKJV

 

God works behind the scenes in the hearts of people to provide just what David needed to continue on. So a servant of the Lord must always entrust his personal needs to the Lord.

 

Now, slip back with me to that third point we saw. When David was at his lowest moment of his life--he bows and worshipped and offered up a Psalm of praise to God—even through bitter tears of sorrow and grief.

 

2 Samuel 15:30, 32 So David went up by the Ascent of the Mount of Olives, and wept as he went up; and he had his head covered and went barefoot. And all the people who were with him covered their heads and went up, weeping as they went up. 32 Now it happened when David had come to the top of the mountain, where he worshiped God—there was Hushai the Archite coming to meet him with his robe torn and dust on his head. NKJV

 

God’s servants can continue in worship even when life is tough, difficult, and almost looking like it is impossible to go on. Turn with me to the exact record of the worship that flowed from David. This is what can flow from us if we like David—bow in worship when the bitter tears of sorrow and grief fall across our lives.

 

David trusted God’s control. He relied upon it and prayed for it. Instead of fear he had faith and gave worship.

 

What does David do? He writes a Psalm. A Psalm is a worship song, truth offered to God in worship that is to be shared by participation. David invites us by God’s help and power to join in and participate in praising God for what He has done.

 

The 3rd Psalm is an amazing Psalm: it is the first Psalm in the Bible called a Psalm; it is the first Psalm noted as written by David; and it is the first Psalm that gives us a Divinely written setting in the first verse of the Hebrew text.

 

Psalm 3:1-8 (NIV) A psalm of David. When he fled from his son Absalom.

 

o        LORD, how many are my foes! How many rise up against me! 2 Many are saying of me, “God will not deliver him.” Selah

o        3 But you are a shield around me, O LORD; you bestow glory on me and lift up my head. 4 To the LORD I cry aloud, and he answers me from his holy hill. Selah

o        5 I lie down and sleep; I wake again, because the LORD sustains me. 6 I will not fear the tens of thousands drawn up against me on every side. 7 Arise, O LORD! Deliver me, O my God! Strike all my enemies on the jaw; break the teeth of the wicked. 8 From the LORD comes deliverance. May your blessing be on your people. Selah

 

Psalm 3:1-8 (NAS) A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son.

 

o        Lord, how my adversaries have increased! Many are rising up against me. 2 Many are saying of my soul, “There is no deliverance for him in God.” [Selah].

o        3 But Thou, O Lord, art a shield about me, My glory, and the One who lifts my head. 4 I was crying to the Lord with my voice, And He answered me from His holy mountain.[Selah].

o        5 I lay down and slept; I awoke, for the Lord sustains me. 6 I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people Who have set themselves against me round about. 7 Arise, O Lord; save me, O my God! For Thou hast smitten all my enemies on the cheek; Thou hast shattered the teeth of the wicked. 8 Salvation belongs to the Lord; Thy blessing be upon Thy people! [Selah].

 

Psalm 3:1-8 A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son. NKJV

 

o        1 Lord, how they have increased who trouble me! Many are they who rise up against me. 2 Many are they who say of me, “There is no help for him in God.” SELAH

o        3 But You, O Lord, are a shield for me, My glory and the One who lifts up my head. 4 I cried to the Lord with my voice, And He heard me from His holy hill. SELAH

o        5 I lay down and slept; I awoke, for the Lord sustained me. 6 I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people Who have set themselves against me all around. 7 Arise, O Lord; Save me, O my God! For You have struck all my enemies on the cheekbone; You have broken the teeth of the ungodly. 8 Salvation belongs to the Lord. Your blessing is upon Your people. SELAH

 

This Psalm is set in the context of battles. If you trace through the verses you find about seven different indications of warfare and battlefields are the setting:

 

1.      David was facing “foes” NIV; “adversaries” NAS (v. 1);

2.      David needed a “shield” (v. 3);

3.      David saw them deployed like an army v.6 “set against me” (NAS/NKJV) “drawn up against me” (NIV);

4.      David calls them “enemies (v. 7);

5.      David cries “arise O Lord” v.7 and uses the actual formula for entering battle from Numbers 10:35;

6.      David speaks of armies (“people” in v. 8 can also be used for an army);

7.      David sought victory implied by the word “deliverance” (v. 8 NIV), and deliverance from the Lord is a war cry.

 

This Psalm divides up the message God is giving through David by the use of the word SELAH. Selah means ‘lift up’ and is a musical term for crescendo. It means boom it out, crank it up—punctuate that with emphasis. Then stop and ask yourself what do you think of that?

 

So at the end of verse two, ‘many say there is no help for him in God.’ Selah—boom! Stop and consider this. What do you think of that? And David pauses and thinks about that and finds a lifetime of definite proof that God did care for him.

 

So at the end of verse four he says, ‘He answered me…’. Selah—boom! Stop and consider this. What do you think of that? And David reflects upon his steadfast hope, and confident faith that God has rescued him in the past and will continue to do so.

 

So at the end of verse eight he says, ‘Salvation is of the Lord’. Selah—boom! Stop and consider this. What do you think of that? And David reflects upon the truth that it is God who alone can save us from all and any of our deepest troubles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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