The morning walk with dog friend Hannah and my trusty iPod generated some thoughts. A tune by Kenny Chesney is chock full of catchy rhythms and bad theology. The song is called Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven but the underlying theme is that nobody wants to go there right now. I think that is true for most of us. As long as God allows I want to live and serve here while I enjoy family and friends.

But what caught my ear was the theology. I am aware that Kenny Chesney is not a theologian so I am not throwing him under his tour bus. I found it interesting because the song reflects the theology of many people and churches in this nation. It used to be mine.

Preacher told me last Sunday mornin`
Son, you better start livin` right
You need to quit the women and whiskey
And carrying on all night

My issues might not have been whiskey and carrying on all night but I had plenty of my own. A big part of my struggle was my church upbringing. Preachers telling me I had to do better, shape up, quit sinning and live right. It was always mixed in with a huge bag of what ifs. If you don't live right you won't go to heaven. If you sin you will lose your salvation and you won't go to heaven. If you don't believe the doctrine of this church you won't go to heaven. So getting to heaven meant conforming my behavior to earn God's favor and making sure I did it all the time. Or else.

The problem in the message of this song and my upbringing is that the onus falls on the sinner to shape up and quit sinning. Good luck. Can't do it. Only daily trust and dependence on God can begin to accomplish that daunting task. The next verse also suggests that we can do something to manage our sin debt by paying a little sin tax.

Said preacher maybe you didn`t see me
Throw an extra twenty in the plate
There`s one for everything I did last night
And one to get me through today

Here`s a ten to help you remember
Next time you got the good Lord`s ear

Donations for past or future sins won't get it done. The problem is not that I had a list of bad behaviors. The problem was sin. No word as powerfully communicates any behavior that separated me from a Holy God. The Old Testament law did not convict me of blunders, slip-ups and shortcomings. The law convicted me of sin. When we try to diminish the concept of sin we negate the awesome gift of grace. You don't need grace to rescue you from idiosyncrasies. I haven't been moved by a hymn that says…

Amazing Grace. How sweet the sound,
That empowered a dysfunctional but spiritually seeking and fundamentally good person like me.

Somehow John Newton's original line about saving a wretch like me hits a little closer to the truth. I am not talking about self-bashing and looking for fault. I am not talking about the potential false humility of spiritual groveling. I am talking about the mind boggling prospect of facing a holy and sinless God with the resume that I would have to present. Am I a good person? Yeah, I think so. Am I up to that appointment without the redemptive endorsement of Jesus? No way.

Sin breaks the covenant between a Holy God and myself. God doesn't bring in the golden scales to weigh our sins versus our good deeds. Sin separates me from relationship with God. I had a sin problem and I needed that fixed. Jesus came to fix it. That gift of forgiveness is incomprehensible. Jesus called sin by it's name. And He said if we believe in faith that He came to deal with that sin debt then He will call us by another name. His child. All it takes is accepting the gift of salvation. That is how you get to heaven.

Don`t you wanna hear him call your name
When you`re standin` at the pearly gates
I told the preacher, "Yes I do"
But I hope they don`t call today
I ain`t ready

That is part of the tension isn't it? No one knows when that call will come. No matter when the call comes you can be ready. Paul wrote this to the church in Rome.

If you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. (Romans 10:9, NLT)

With all due respect to the talented Mr.Chesney I think Paul is a better theologian.