If ever we had a reason for prayers of gratitude, this year would be that occasion because President Bush took, I believe, a very courageous position [regarding the war with Iraq]. He was vindicated by the events and loss of life was kept to a minimum. I hope everybody has been praying regularly for the President and for the war and for Don Rumsfeld, and for the military men and women. If they have been, as I have been, praying for them, then this is a day to pray with great thanksgiving.

 

The second thing that is always an element in prayer, and ought to be so particularly today, is repentance. Repenting of our own indifference is, for me, the most important thing. The overt sins that we all have, and the secret sins we have, we need to be confessing, of course. But we also need to confess to our indifference as a people. We are often ungrateful. We often don't show gratitude by how we live. God seems to get our attention, whether its SARS or earthquakes in the East, or whether it's wars or terrorism. We have no reason to be indifferent. It's a scandal of the American church that we are very self absorbed.

 

Finally, I would pray for those in authority. I was with the President this weekend - had an hour's session with him actually - as we talked through the issues surrounding AIDS in Africa effort - a very noble effort that he is undertaking. The President made statements about his own Christian faith that were just unequivocal in this meeting of 12 people. And it's such a refreshing thing to feel you've got a brother in the presidency. I think Christians have a special obligation to be praying for him right now.

 

Editor's Note: Mr. Colson graciously shared his reflections on the National Day of Prayer this morning, during an interview about his new book, Being the Body. Watch for that article on Crosswalk.com May 15. For more information about Being the Body click here.

 


Retired Nixon White House Aide and former Watergate felon Chuck Colson founded Prison Fellowship Ministries in 1976, which has since become the world's largest outreach to prisoners, ex-prisoners, and their families. Colson has written 23 books, which collectively have sold more than five million copies.