Sentenced as a galley slave on a French ship, he looked up as they sailed passed St. Andrews, Scotland, and said: "I see the steeple of that place where God first in public opened my mouth to glory; and I am fully persuaded...I shall not depart this life till my tongue shall glorify his godly name in the same place." John Knox was eventually released, met John Calvin, and returned to Scotland, where he confronted Mary, Queen of Scots, mother of England's King James I. In 1560, John Knox led Scotland to establish the Presbyterian Church. Dying NOVEMBER 24, 1572, John Knox stated: "A man with God is always in the majority." A descendant of John Knox was Presbyterian minister John Witherspoon, who signed the Declaration of Independence and, as President of Princeton, taught James Madison. On May 26, 1789, the Presbyterian Churches in the United States wrote to President Washington: "We...esteem it a peculiar happiness to behold in our Chief Magistrate, a steady, avowed friend of the Christian religion...who, in his private conduct, adorns the doctrines of the gospel of Christ." President Washington replied in May of 1789: "While I reiterate the professions of my dependence upon Heaven...I will observe that...no man who is profligate in his morals...can possibly be a true Christian."