William Lloyd Garrison published the Boston anti-slavery paper "Liberator" and founded the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833. Suffering hundreds of death threats for his politically incorrect stand on the value of human life, Garrison died MAY 24, 1879. He wrote: "I desire to thank God that He enables me to disregard 'the fear of man which bringeth a snare' and to speak His truth...while life-blood warms my throbbing veins...to oppose...the brutalizing sway - till Afric's chains are burst and freedom rules the rescued land" In "W.P. and F.J.T. Garrison," 1885-89, he wrote: "Wherever there is a human being, I see God-given rights inherent in that being, whatever may be the sex or complexion." Former slave Frederick Douglass wrote in My Bondage and My Freedom, 1855: "After reaching New Bedford, there came a young man to me with a copy of the Liberator...edited by William Lloyd Garrison...His paper took its place with me next to the Bible...It detested slavery...and, with all the solemnity of God's word, demanded the complete emancipation of my race...His words were... holy fire...The Bible was his text book...Prejudice against color was rebellion against God."