Paul Tautges Christian Blog and Commentary

Seeing God's Gracious Hand in the Hurts Others Do to Us

  • Paul Tautges Crosswalk.com blogspot for pastor and counseling Paul Tautges of counselingoneanother.com
  • 2020 Mar 31

Suffering at the hands of other people is extremely painful. However, even when this occurs, we can know that God’s sovereignty rules over all, and that he working out his will for our good and his glory. Let me illustrate the interworking of good and bad, within the divine mystery of providence, by directing your attention to the life of Joseph.

Sold into slavery by his brothers, taken to a foreign land, falsely accused by an immoral woman, and thrown into prison . . . Joseph was forgotten, even by the men whom he had helped get out of prison! (Genesis 37–40). Many years later, however, Joseph was exalted to international prominence, and reunited with his family. When his brothers realized the au­thority Joseph possessed, they feared he would treat them the way they had treated him. But this only proved they did not really know their brother, at least their “new brother,” the one humbled by suffering, and filled with grace. As he looked into his brothers’ frightened eyes, Joseph said, “As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good in order to bring about this present result, to preserve many people alive” (Genesis 50:20 ).

Think about it. God used multiple griefs and losses to strategically place Joseph in the second most powerful position in the Egyptian government, and to move his family into the path of abundant blessing. God did this to ful­fill his promise to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (Joseph’s great-grandfather, grandfather, and father), and to save his chosen people from worldwide famine. Most importantly, by doing so, God preserved the earthly line of Jesus Christ (Matthew 1:1–16 ). Consider what good would never have taken place had Joseph not been betrayed, falsely accused, and imprisoned.

Look backward with me. Notice the good which God brought about from so much bad. Continue reading...



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