WEEK 2

Open the Book—Read It and Take Notes

Pray that God would reveal himself to you through this book.

Closely (and slowly) read the book of Hebrews again. Write down your questions. Let the text speak for itself, and let God speak through it. This will allow you to discern God's will for your life.

Make any links you can between the different parts of the book. Look at how the book has been paragraphed in your Bible and ask yourself which paragraphs correspond with other ones.

Look for key grammatical markers like "therefore," "but" and "now." Underline or highlight them. These grammatical terms are a way of marking a shift in an author's thoughts.

Pray now and throughout your week for other people's needs, especially those in a time of trial.

Continue to go through these steps throughout your week.

WEEK 3

The Connection between Long Ago and Today

Pray that God would reveal his plan for humanity to you through this book.

Read Heb 1:1-4. Reflect on 1:1-2 and answer the following questions:

What has occurred "long ago"? Whom did God speak "to" and whom did he speak "by means of"? What does this tell us about how God spoke in the past?

What has occurred in "these last days"? Whom is God speaking "by" in "these last days"? What does this tell us about how God currently speaks?

Are we still living in "these last days"? What (if anything) has changed since the author wrote this book around 68 AD? Why are these last days lasting so long?

Is there an intentional switch between what has occurred "long ago" and what is occurring in "these last days"? What does this say about the significance of God's Son entering the world?

What is God's Son the heir "of"? What did God do through his Son?

Is there a link between God's ability to create and God's Son?

There is an illusion to Psa 2:8 in this passage. What does the author's reflection on this psalm tell us about God's Son and God's plan for humanity? (Keep in mind that the author is interpreting a book written centuries before).

Continue to reflect and pray through these questions throughout your week.

WEEK 4

The Son's Identity

Pray that God would reveal Himself to you through the power of His Word.

Read Heb 1:1-4. Reflect on 1:3-4 and answer the following questions:

What is the identity and role of the Son?

What kind of imagery is the author evoking in this passage? Use a concordance to look up the usage of the word "glory" in the Old Testament (specifically in Exodus and the Psalms).

What does being God's Son entail? What is the meaning of this term in the book of Hebrews, and in the rest of the Bible? Are any other individuals called sons of God? Look at Psa 29:1 and Psa 89:6 (the literal translation of "heavenly beings" is "sons of God" in these passages).

In the first century, angels (sons of God) were believed to be God's warriors and messengers. Could this be the reason why the author states that the Son is superior to the angels?

Is the Son's superiority a theme in other places in the book?

Why is it important that the Son is superior to the angels?

Where does the author provide support for the claim that the Son is superior to the angels?

Continue to reflect and pray through these questions throughout your week.

WEEK 5

Support for the Son's Unique Superiority

Pray that God would reveal His Son's superiority over all your struggles.

Read Heb 1:1-4. Reflect on 1:5-6 and answer the following questions:

The author quotes Psa 2:7 in 5:5a—Read Psa 2. What is the theme of this psalm? What figures are involved? How is God characterized? Why would the author choose to quote this passage?

The author quotes 2 Sam 7:14 in 5:5b—Read 2 Sam 7:1:17. What is the message of this story? What characters are involved? What is the significance of 2 Sam 7:14 in 2 Sam 7:1-17? What theme does Psa 2 and 2 Sam 7:1-17 share in common?