Posted by Jim_Daly Jul 26, 2012

It was 12 short years ago that the doctor placed a tiny little boy in my arms, his eyes still closed and his skin soft and pink. itsaboy1.jpg

Trent and I became fast friends, my little buddy by my side, and I wondered if any father had ever loved a son as much as I loved mine.

Two years later that scene was repeated, and I quickly discovered that love multiplies.

I began to wonder again, this time if any father had ever loved his two sons as much I love ours.

I’m remembering those early days lately, of holding and feeding our tiny boys, of talking to them about the dreams I had for them and about the life that I prayed the Lord would allow them to live.

I did most of the talking in those early days. They cooed and smiled and soon the babbling began. Full words followed and a new season was quickly ushered in. Conversing with little kids can be a lot of fun, can’t it? You tend to use small words to talk about big things.

This stands in contrast to adulthood when you tend to use big words to describe small things.

As a parent, you quickly realize that profound truths are communicated in the simplest of all settings. I can think of lots of great talks in a sandbox or on swings and later, over Legos and in a car pulling a camper up a steep mountain pass. PFAbook1.jpg

This coming Saturday, I’m anticipating another conversation – but it’s not about sports or the 4,000-piece Stars Wars Lego set. Instead, I’m going to broach the “big talk” with Trent. Jean and I have been deliberate about introducing sex education is small doses through the years on age-appropriate levels. But now the time seems right to sit down and cover a few of the more sensitive subjects.

I’ll be honest, I’m a little nervous about it! Not having a father present for most of my growing up years, I don’t have a point of personal reference. I’ve been reading up on some of the best available resources, including our founder, Dr. James Dobson’s Preparing for Adolescence, as well as Dennis Rainey’s and Jim Burns’ material.

Studies confirm that when parents and children maintain a healthy dialogue about sexual matters kids tend to engage in far less risky behavior as an adolescent. It’s not the easiest of seasons of life – but it sure is a critically important one.

I’m prepped and have a game plan in place – but still, please pray for me!

Do any of you care to offer some advice? How did the experience go for you?

I’ll let you know how it goes.

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