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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Teen Athletes at Greater Risk for Osteoarthritis

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2011 Jul 27
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Children and teens with abnormal development of the long bone between the pelvis and knee from playing high-intensity sports, such as soccer and basketball, are at greater risk for osteoarthritis of the hip, according to a new study.

Swiss researchers explained that deformities of the top of that bone -- known as the femur -- leads to reduced rotation and pain during movement among young competitive athletes. This may explain why athletes are more likely to develop osteoarthritis than more sedentary individuals, according to Dr. Klaus Siebenrock, from the University of Bern in Switzerland.

The study showed that men and teens that had played in an elite basketball club since the age of 8 were more likely to have osteoarthritis of the hip than in those who did not take part in regular sports. The athletes, the researchers found, had femur deformities causing their thighbone to have abnormal contact with their hip socket.

Overall, the researchers found, athletes were 10 times more likely to have impaired hip function than those who did not play high-intensity sports.

Source: Doctors Lounge
http://www.doctorslounge.com/index.php/news/hd/21846