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Lessons Are Learned the Crass Way in Georgia Rule

Georgia Rule is a super-heavy downer with a high cringe factor and a steady infusion of crassness and perversion. Yes, there are important lessons to be learned about relationships and generational patterns, but it’s not worth the ride to get there.

Hollywood Caters to Basest Instinct in Old Skool

Once again, Hollywood caters to its basest instinct with another uninspired, insulting and cheaply-made rip-off—Kickin’ It Old Skool. It’s Big meets The Bad News Bears (remake) meets a very bad skit from Saturday Night Live.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 31, 2007 |
  • comments
Laughs and Lewdness Make the Cut in Blades

With its over-the-top, absurd storyline, Blades of Glory offers plenty of one-liners that will likely become as memorable as the lines in Napoleon Dynamite. The downside? Perverted jokes, sexual allusions, references to or portrayals of drinking, drugs, smoking, and homosexuality, and a barrage of slapstick violence.

Ultimate Gift Poses Important Life Questions

What matters most in life? And what happens when we don’t appreciate the many gifts that life offers? These are the questions posed by FoxFaith's newest theatrical release, The Ultimate Gift.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 21, 2007 |
  • comments
Perfect Stranger Is Perfectly Awful

The best movies can become like old friends, a pleasure to see from time to time. Others are like uninvited guests - perfect strangers who deserve to be shown the door, never to be welcomed again. Can you guess which category this movie falls into?

  • Christian Hamaker |
  • August 21, 2007 |
  • comments
Indie Feel Makes Lookout a Different Kind of Thriller

The Lookout is simply a different kind of thriller—one that has an indie feel to it, with lots of time spent on character development. For those who prefer the standard Hollywood genre thriller, it’s sure to disappoint.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 20, 2007 |
  • comments
God Grew Tired of Us Chronicles Lost Boys' New Life

Writer/director Christopher Quinn chose to focus on just three “lost boys” in his award-winning documentary, God Grew Tired of Us. After arriving in America, John Bul Dau, Panther Bior and Daniel Abul Pach soon discover how lonely life can be in this country, and how very hard people work, just to stay alive

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 17, 2007 |
  • comments
Shameful Vacancy Earns Timely Condemnation

A horrible tragedy such as the Virginia Tech massacre has, in a strangely unexpected way, opened the door for Christian critics to state what’s blindingly obvious: That some films, like Vacancy, are bad for the soul.

  • Christian Hamaker |
  • August 14, 2007 |
  • comments
A Heartless Hopkins Gives Steely Edge to Fracture

Fracture gives Anthony Hopkins his juiciest role in years. Although lagging for stretches, the movie is worth seeing for its portrayal of villainy and the cat-and-mouse legal game that will keep viewers guessing until the final moments of the film.

  • Christian Hamaker |
  • August 14, 2007 |
  • comments
Raunchy Wild Hogs Belongs in the Slop Bucket

Wild Hogs is the story of four guys trying to escape from suburbia. In what’s essentially a less sophisticated City Slickers meets Easy Rider, it doesn’t take long for the humor to make its way directly to the slop bucket.

Engaging Mars a Great Trek for Parents, Children

Roving Mars is an engaging, well-made film that will interest even young children, provided parents are willing to narrate what is happening on-screen as NASA scientists send geologist robots ("rovers") to the distant planet of Mars.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 13, 2007 |
  • comments
I Think I Love My Wife a Surprisingly Truthful Film

The film is extremely loose when it comes to language and sexual themes. If you can get past this, however, you’ll find that Chris Rock makes some insightful points, all within the context of excellent acting and direction.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 10, 2007 |
  • comments
Pro-Family Messages Are Found in Are We Done Yet?

Nick Persons is back. After his disastrous road trip with little Kevin and Lindsey in the 2005 film Are We There Yet?, Nick sold the store and married spunky single mom Suzanne. Now, he’s settling into family life. Well, sort of, anyway.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 10, 2007 |
  • comments
Turtles Are Mutated Once Again in TMNT

The year was actually 1984 when the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles were first invented. Now, rather inexplicably, they’ve been resurrected from their cinematic grave. Why? No doubt, to market more junk to another generation of unsuspecting kids and gullible parents.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 09, 2007 |
  • comments
No Remedy to Soulless Living in Everything's Gone Green

Unfortunately, screenwriter Douglas Copeland never offers a remedy to the soulless living he so devastatingly describes in Everything’s Gone Green. It ends on an extremely nihilistic note—which is, of course, the curse of this postmodern age.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 06, 2007 |
  • comments
Hot Fuzz Sure to Please Parody, Horror and Cop Fans

Written, directed and acted by the same team that gave us the hilarious zombie spoof, Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz is sure to please fans of parody as well as horror and cop movies. Think Monty Python meets Bad Boys II meets Halloween IV, and you’ll get the idea.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • August 06, 2007 |
  • comments
Violent 300 a Perverse Form of Eye Candy

Filled with violent battle scenes, gory killings and some surprisingly explicit sex, 300 is a perverse form of eye candy. A war epic that arrives in the midst of the United States' ongoing war against Islamic radicalism, it offers, at best, only faint echoes of the current conflict.

Firehouse Dog a Mediocre Breed of Family Movie

While it could’ve been an entertaining, heart-warming movie about a family being brought closer together, Firehouse Dog settles for a lowbrow humor and an unconvincing plot that’ll likely leave the younger audience confused by this mixed breed of a movie.

Brisk Pacing Not Enough to Ignite Slow Burn

Slow Burn moves along at a brisk pace. Too brisk, really, at just 93 minutes, which adds to the challenge of trying to follow the plot. Some will be put off by the film’s overt sexuality as well—an overt contrivance which takes every advantage of the leading lady’s curves.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • July 27, 2007 |
  • comments
Factory Girl Fails with a Superficial Script

Factory Girl fails because it rests upon such a superficial script. The story never delves beneath the surface to explore why Andy Warhol was the way he was. And, while Edie Sedgwick’s problems are alluded to, they are never dealt with other than in the most trite way.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • July 24, 2007 |
  • comments
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