Decent Americans across the country are so disgusted by a culture that doesn’t reflect their values, a society that trashes the family, and a government gone wild, that they often feel helpless and hopeless about the future of our nation. So I think they’ll join me in saying:  Thank goodness for Laura Ingraham’s latest book, Power to the People.

Loyal listeners of "The Laura Ingraham Show" are addicted to her gutsy take on the issues of the day, making her one of the most powerful people in talk radio (and certainly the most powerful woman). I’m convinced that a key reason people love Laura is because she also gives her audience the courage we need to become powerful forces of our own. Yes, Power to the People provides an in-depth look at important issues and arms readers with facts and figures. But it also gives something else—something often missing from political prose:  inspiration to lift your voice and be heard.

Laura uses biblical promises and personal stories to illustrate how God can use us to make a difference. This confident, strong woman doesn’t hold back on sharing pain, humor and her own struggles to show how God can use each of us—even in the midst of our weakness—to stand for truth.

On the airwaves, in print and in person, Laura delights in expressing a refreshing bluntness about the absurdities and issues of the day—a perspective that entertains and informs millions daily. Her radio show is heard on more than 340 stations nationwide, and she’s had several best selling books.

But what makes Laura stand out among media stars and what really makes Power to the People the must-read book of the year—is her willingness to, well, “be real” with her audience. She boldly writes about pivotal points in her life, just as she has shared them on the radio. Listeners lived with Laura through her struggle with breast cancer and the cruel effects of chemotherapy. We felt her heartache and confusion when her engagement was ended by a fiancé who couldn’t handle her illness; we’ve cheered her on when liberals attacked her words and her integrity.

And what we’ve come to learn through all these battles is that Laura will not be broken—she always emerges as a champion. And then we realize that if Laura can rise above miserable circumstances, victorious to fight another day, then we can too.

So it’s appropriate that Power to the People is more than just clever prose (although it is that)—it’s what Laura considers a “call to arms.” As she notes in the introduction:

“The purpose of this book is not just to rile you up (I do that every day on the radio). The goal is to incite you to do your part to protect the country that we love. It is ours to lose. And there are many here and abroad who are more than willing to take it from us.”

Like who, for example? Well, take the politicians who were pushing “comprehensive immigration reform” earlier this year. Despite the fact that it would have given amnesty to millions of illegal aliens—in this country and breaking the law even as we speak—politicians on both sides of the aisle campaigned hard for it. My colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, along with Laura and other stalwart conservatives, worked feverishly to keep the American people informed about this massive threat.

It worked. Americans from all across the country voiced their ire in no uncertain terms, and the amnesty-backers had to back down. Which didn’t make them very happy. As Laura notes, “Given how effective conservative talk radio has been in mobilizing the electorate, it is any wonder that politicians and left-wing activists are trying to figure out how to regulate it out of existence?” (Remember that the next time you hear some leftie tout the “Fairness Doctrine,” which—free-speech concerns aside! —would force broadcasters to air “both sides” of an issue. Gee, folks, ever heard of letting the market decide?)