Crosswalk.com aims to offer the most compelling biblically-based content to Christians on their walk with Jesus. Crosswalk.com is your online destination for all areas of Christian Living – faith, family, fun, and community. Each category is further divided into areas important to you and your Christian faith including Bible study, Bible verses, marriage, parenting, movie reviews, music, news, and more.

GO

Christian Living Resources, Bible Study Tools, Jesus Christ

Rendition Tortures Viewers with Simplicity and Slow Pacing

While “extraordinary rendition” is certainly a provocative topic in a post 9/11 world, the team behind Rendition doesn’t mind choosing the most simplistic, even manipulative, methods to getting its message across.

  • Christa Banister |
  • February 19, 2008 |
  • comments
Unpatriotic Tone Obstructs In the Valley of Elah

This left-wing propaganda film preaches the following message: If you are stupid enough to send your son to war in Iraq, there’s a high chance he will do drugs, torture the enemy for fun and turn so psychotic that he’ll learn to cooly murder his fellow soldiers for no good reason.

  • Eric & Lisa Rice |
  • February 19, 2008 |
  • comments
Why Did I Get Married Proves Dramatic, Uncomfortable

In Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married, not only does Perry offer an important view of wealthy, professional African-Americans, but he also deals with marital woes in a sensitive manner. It’s dramatic, at times, and occasionally uncomfortable to watch.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • February 15, 2008 |
  • comments
Prodigal Son Echoes to Be Found in We Own the Night

Echoes of the prodigal son parable abound in the latest crime film by director-screenwriter James Gray. Although the plot isn’t brilliant and suffers from obvious contrivances, it’s still an engaging spectacle.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • February 14, 2008 |
  • comments
Well-Acted No Reservations Is Pure Comfort Food

Those hoping for a simple boy-meets-girl, boy-loses-girl, boy-and-girl-get-back-together-and-live-happily-ever-after story will get far better comfort food with No Reservations—even if it’s more of a heart-wrenching drama than a by-the-numbers romantic comedy.

  • Christa Banister |
  • February 12, 2008 |
  • comments
Lacking History, Becoming Jane Still Charms

Unlike Miss Potter, the whimsical biopic that centered around the little-known love life that inspired Beatrix Potter’s work, Becoming Jane doesn’t have much in the way of actual history to back up its premise.

  • Christa Banister |
  • February 12, 2008 |
  • comments
Gritty Gone Baby Gone Begs Tough Decisions

Based on Dennis Lehane’s novel of the same name, Gone Baby Gone beckons us to play God right along with the protagonist and ask ourselves what hard decision we would make about the life and well-being of a little kidnapped girl.

  • Eric & Lisa Rice |
  • February 12, 2008 |
  • comments
John Cusack Keeps Martian Child Down to Earth

Much like Hugh Grant’s foray into more serious fare with 2002’s About a Boy, John Cusack, another consummate bachelor in real life, proves he’s got dramatic range and emotional gravitas in the otherworldly drama Martian Child.

  • Christa Banister |
  • February 12, 2008 |
  • comments
Dysfunctional Family Overstays Its Welcome in The Dwights

Last year’s Little Miss Sunshine proved there was an audience for a quirky indie film about a dysfunctional family. And naturally, when a film like that meets with unexpected success, it’s not long before copycat efforts follow—like the largely unimpressive Introducing the Dwights.

  • Christa Banister |
  • February 12, 2008 |
  • comments
Beatles Fans Might Enjoy This Trip Across the Universe

If you’re looking for a straightforward narrative—and musicals aren’t your thing—you’ll want to bypass Across the Universe. But if you’re a big Beatles fan and love all things ‘60s, this is definitely worth the trip. Goo goo g’joob.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • February 07, 2008 |
  • comments
Language, Violence Weaken a Well-Crafted Brave One

With the white-knuckle suspense of Flightplan, the “keep it real” radio host vibe of Talk to Me, and the terrifying psycho-thriller shock effect of Mr. Brooks, The Brave One is a well-crafted, entertaining film marred by excessive foul language, violence and a dark worldview.

Jane Austen Book Club is Mediocre at Best

These days we certainly seem to be mad about Jane … Jane Austen that is. Yet it's hard to imagine either the author or her fans particularly enthusiastic about The Jane Austen Book Club, the latest entry in the ever-growing list of Austen-themed films.

  • Stephen McGarvey |
  • February 05, 2008 |
  • comments
Bleak, Beautiful Jesse James Is Worth a Look

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford examines how entertainment culture exploits historical truth. The result is a beautiful, slow-paced examination of the wages of sin, and the conflicted role of the public and its view of history.

  • Christian Hamaker |
  • February 05, 2008 |
  • comments
Nearly Perfect Elizabeth Ties History to Entertainment

Elizabeth: The Golden Age is a fascinating, nearly perfect film. It’s always wonderful to tie history to entertainment, and the history of Europe in the 1500s is very exciting. The movie unfolds the age-old conflict between Protestants and Catholics, and shows how each side is praying for victory.

High School, Debate Team … It's All Rocket Science

This film by writer/director Jeffrey Blitz pulls back the veil on high school debating, showing us the popular rapid-fire speech pattern called “spreading.” He also portrays what it’s like to be in high school, without all the clichés that plague other school films.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • February 01, 2008 |
  • comments
Good Messages, New Cast Can't Rescue This Bad Daddy

With some surprisingly good messages and some decent acting from a new cast, it’s a shame that Daddy Day Camp is such a bad sequel. The plot is predictable, and loaded with the two Hollywood “requirements” for kid films: body humor and bratty children.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • January 30, 2008 |
  • comments
Alien Virus Returns in a Creepy Invasion

What would happen if a space shuttle crashed on earth, carrying an alien virus on the thousands of scattered parts? Answering this question, The Invasion borrows from the old Invasion of the Body Snatchers without totally copying the film. And it’s good and creepy!

Blonde Ambition Achieves Little for Simpson Fans

The target audience for Blonde Ambition is a mystery. With such patently silly production values, it seems geared to young girls and fans of Jessica Simpson. But its language and sexuality make it only appropriate for older teens or adults.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • January 29, 2008 |
  • comments
Trade Is Troubling in More Ways Than One

Trade, an uneven drama about human trafficking, deserves begrudging respect for raising the public’s awareness of troubling subject matter. The film nevertheless suffers from awkward melodrama and feeble dialogue.

  • Christian Hamaker |
  • January 29, 2008 |
  • comments
The Game Plan Lays the Cute on Thick

While bordering on the cheesy and laying the cute on thick, The Game Plan is still a fairly solid choice for amusing family entertainment. What’s refreshing is the noticeable lack of curse words and rude humor typically used to cover up plot holes.

  • Christa Banister |
  • January 22, 2008 |
  • comments
GO
Example: "Gen 1:1" "John 3" "Moses" "trust"
advertise with us

Shopping

RSS

Add Crosswalk.com content to your site

Browse available content