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Nicholas Nickleby (2002)

Charles Dickens stories are typically tragic and therefore, full of depressing scenarios. But I enjoyed this film adaptation because of the seasoned cast and interesting setting.

 
Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist

Michael Cera’s latest role as the Nick of Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, floats across the screen like it was written just for him—showcasing his unpretentious charm and carrying an otherwise forgettable movie.

  • Stephen McGarvey |
  • October 03, 2008 |
  • comments
 
Night at the Museum

While there’s certainly a few questionable moments with the movie’s worldview and a lengthy run time, "Night at the Museum" is largely a flick that both kids and adults will enjoy.

  • Christa Banister |
  • December 22, 2006 |
  • comments
 
Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian

Can lightning strike twice in the same place? It can if you switch locations and seriously revamp the storyline, which is exactly what the filmmakers smartly did this time around in the sequel, Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian.

 
Night Listener, The

I wasn't engaged by the story or its “mystery,” which seemed fairly humdrum, “Law and Order” style. Once you’re over the disturbing sexual content and, of course, the phallic humor so ubiquitous in homosexual-themed films, it’s still a very mediocre effort.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • January 15, 2007 |
  • comments
 
Nights in Rodanthe

Like 2004’s The Notebook, an adaptation of author Nicholas Sparks’ best-selling book, Nights in Rodanthe is a tearjerker. But unlike its predecessor, this film labors under a plodding pace and melodramatic, made-for-TV storyline.

  • Christa Banister |
  • September 26, 2008 |
  • comments
 
Nim's Island

Likely targeting kids five through twelve, the latest Walden Media film is a family-friendly, take-me-away adventure with a good message about finding heroism from within.

 
Nine

Even with five Oscar-winning actresses delivering fantastic performances without really having that much to work with, the screen adaptation of Broadway musical Nine may have the star wattage but ultimately does little in the way of actually illuminating the audience.

  • Christa Banister |
  • December 18, 2009 |
  • comments
 
No Country for Old Men

No Country for Old Men’s greatest asset—or liability, depending on how you interpret it—is the struggle for answers to profound questions: How can well-meaning people confront unstoppable evil? Is there any hope to do so apart from God?

  • Christian Hamaker |
  • November 09, 2007 |
  • comments
 
No Reservations

Those hoping for a simple boy-meets-girl, boy-loses-girl, boy-and-girl-get-back-together-and-live-happily-ever-after story will get far better comfort food with No Reservations—even if it’s more of a heart-wrenching drama than a by-the-numbers romantic comedy.

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No Strings Attached

Playing out like When Harry Met Sally in reverse, No Strings Attached examines modern sexual mores by posing the following question: Can men and women just sleep together on a regular basis without the pesky inconvenience of falling in love getting in the way?

  • Christa Banister |
  • January 21, 2011 |
  • comments
 
Noah

Rife with theological exploration but never preachy, Noah sets a new standard for films to be both spiritually engaging and entertaining.

 
Non-Stop

From the first hazy moments shrouded in a faint sense of impending doom to the final resolution, this is a thinking person's action film.

  • Susan Ellingburg |
  • February 28, 2014 |
  • comments
 
Norbit

For those who saw Daddy Daycare and Doctor Doolittle, and were hoping for some more “Eddie-Murphy’s-now-a-dad-so-he’s-making-cute-family-films” movies, don’t hold your breath. His latest comedy, Norbit, has way more crassness going for it than cuteness.

 
North Country

"North Country," a tale of one woman’s crusade for equal treatment in a male-dominated workplace, has all the subtlety of a mediocre TV movie. The story, “inspired” by true events but veering far from the actual facts of the historic case on which it’s based, paints its main character as a misunderstood saint amidst vile villains with the worst of intentions.

  • Christian Hamaker |
  • October 21, 2005 |
  • comments
 
Not Today

In a summer of bloated blockbusters, this is one of the few movies everyone should see because of the message it sends: slavery is real.

 
Notebook, The

Despite its distracting detours into the bedroom, “The Notebook” (based on the Nicholas Sparks novel) gives us a portrait of a love that always protects, always trusts, always hopes, and always perseveres.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • June 17, 2004 |
  • comments
 
Notes on a Scandal

"Notes on a Scandal" reminds us how vulnerable we all are to sin – even the most egregious kind. We may think we’re impervious, but we shouldn’t allow ourselves to be so naïve.

  • Annabelle Robertson |
  • April 19, 2007 |
  • comments
 
Now You See Me

Plays like a movie equivalent of a CBS procedural: high in concept, production artifice, and plot holes, while low in character depth.

 
Number 23, The

When it’s said and done, there’s not much about “The Number 23” that actually adds up. It’s ultimately nothing more than a superstition gone seriously awry that wastes the talent of actors like Jim Carrey and Virginia Madsen.

  • Christa Banister |
  • February 23, 2007 |
  • comments
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