The Fear Factor: Do you ever find yourself intimidated by certain subjects? I know many moms dread teaching science, perhaps because of their own weak science background. Some of them attempt to avoid the subject entirely; others overreact and try to cram years' worth of information into a single year.

 

I just heard from one parent who has scheduled her little kindergartener for a full, three-day-a-week science program using a complete curriculum along with all the extras. But she's still concerned it isn't enough. Ever been there? I sure have! It's easy to feel either insecure or overly zealous, especially teaching topics in which we may feel inadequate. But let's remember why we are home schooling . . .

 

God Provides

We began home schooling in 1991, blissfully unaware that there was such a thing as "home-school curriculum." Not knowing any better, I used our own books, the library, Scouts, the community, the Institute for Creation Resource, and the out-of-doors as our science curriculum. You know what? It worked!

Not only did it work, it worked well. My sons have excelled in the sciences and in all the ways one measures science achievement. Most importantly, they are able to logically and compellingly express their understanding and belief in creationism to skeptical evolutionists. Despite my own weakness in this subject, God has again and again provided. We learn about science as another manifestation of loving and glorifying God.

 

It's Supposed To Be At Least Interesting!


I'd like to share with you strategies I've used over the years to teach science and encourage you to relax and enjoy the pursuit of scientific knowledge with your kids. It's ever so much more fun than feeling chained to worksheet pages!

 

I came across this quote by Cathy Duffy a few years ago and found it mirrored exactly what I'd been trying to do with my science courses:

 

Cathy Duffy, author of Christian Home Educator's Curriculum Manual, Elementary Grades writes: "Field Trips, experiments, observation, and nature collections will all stimulate interest [in science] in children. They should be a major part of our science curriculum. ... The best way to meet these goals is NOT by using science textbooks. We can turn our children on to science by teaching them to observe, experiment, read, and think about the things that surround us."

 

Science Goals

My husband and I would choose four topics a year to study in-depth, allowing the boys to have some say in the decision. Then we'd find great resources, take field trips, read-aloud, look things up, and discuss, discuss, discuss. (Well, okay, we are a very verbal family!) What were the goals of all this reading, discussing, and exploring?