Mark Daniels Christian Blog and Commentary

Beware the Trojan Horse

I remember it like it was yesterday. I was 17 years old, and seated in a local restaurant, having dinner on my break from my job at the supermarket. As was my habit, I pulled out a Marlboro…“flicked my Bic”…and noticed Mom and Dad outside the window, watching Junior “light up.” I’m sure they were at least a BIT amused by the “I Love Lucy” skit that transpired next. I quickly tried to make the lighter, and the cigarette, disappear into my pocket...and desperately attempted to maintain my composure…as my ears turned a bright shade of crimson. It didn’t matter to my parents that all my friends were nicotine addicts; the rule for their children was NO SMOKING! Granted, that was way back when there were clear guidelines for behavior, and the pervasive presence of that elusive quality known as a “conscience.” 

 

Fast-forward to the 21st century. California Senator Dianne Feinstein, PA Republican Arlen Specter, and a few of their colleagues are on the right side of the cloning debate—introducing a strict policy against the practice, with heavy penalties for violators of the ban. But it’s a qualified position; the legislation the group of senators proposes comes with a caveat that would permit embryonic stem cell research. The justification offered at Senator Feinstein’s website is a series of headlines from foreign newspapers and periodicals, proclaiming “Eastern Asia powers ahead on stem cell research,” and “UK, India tie up for stem cell study.”  I was reminded of my feeble defense to my parents, as they caught me red-handed: “But Mom…everybody’s doing it.” Remember the story a few months back about the parents who held a beer bash in the family home for their high-school-aged kids and their friends, because they were “just going to do it anyway?” Recall how you wondered what that Mom and Dad must have been smoking?

Like my sainted parents, we must make a clear, non-equivocating statement with every stand we take—especially when human life is in question.   A strong position against human cloning doesn’t need to be tempered by a concession on embryonic stem cells. For once, let’s just let our “no” be no.

 



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