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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Teens Cooling on Facebook but Warming to Twitter

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2013 May 22
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Some teens are growing tired of the excessive sharing and “drama” on Facebook and more are turning to sites like Twitter and Instagram to express themselves, according to a new study.

“Many teens expressed waning enthusiasm for Facebook,” the Pew Research Center said in a newly released study, based on interviews with 800 teens conducted between July and September last year.

They complained of too many adults on the site, the inane details shared by friends and the “drama” on Facebook, which they find draining, according to the study, conducted by the Pew Internet Project.

“The stress of needing to manage their reputation on Facebook also contributes to the lack of enthusiasm,” the researchers said. On Twitter and Instagram, however, teens felt free from the social expectations and constraints of Facebook, according to the study.

Most teens remain active on Facebook, because it’s “an important part of overall teen socializing,” the study said. But almost a quarter of online teens now use Twitter, up from 16 percent in 2011.

Their disillusionment with Facebook may have something to do with the way they’re using it. Some 70 percent said they are friends with their parents on the site, and only 5 percent restrict what their parents can see, according to the study. So Facebook is probably not a haven for illicit discussion.

Source: TechHive
http://www.techhive.com/article/2039458/teens-growing-cool-on-facebook-but-warming-to-twitter-pew-study-finds.html