4. Your leaving might say something about your pastoral motivation.

Jesus says that hirelings run away when the wolf appears (John 10:12). They are shepherding primarily for selfish reasons -- what they can get out of it -- and when the wolf shows up, a quick cost-benefit calculation leads the hireling to decide that the sheep and the benefits aren't worth the trouble of dealing with the wolf. "They don't pay me enough to mess with that!" the hireling says. In contrast, Jesus wasn't concerned about what He was getting, but whom He was serving. In fact, Jesus came not to be served but to be serve (Mark 10:45), and that caused Him to be willing to face the wolf even if it meant death. He was that concerned for the sheep! Is that same mentality in you? Ask yourself why you are pastoring and why you are thinking about leaving your flock. What motivation surfaces? Is it Christ-like?

5. Your leaving might be based on what you can do instead of what God can do.

We look at situations and say in our flesh, "it's hopeless," but is that declaration ever true in light of the God of the Bible? No way! We who walk by faith and not by sight say with Jeremiah, "Ah, Sovereign LORD, ... nothing is too hard for You!" (Jeremiah 32:17). We often run away because we think that the wolf is too much for us, the whole time being right but forgetting that God will face the wolf with us. Alone, the wolf wins, but with God, the wolf loses. Don't base your decision to leave upon what you can do. Keep in mind what God, the one with whom all things are possible (Matthew 19:26), can do.

Brother Pastor, when the wolf howls outside the sheepfold, abandon not the flock. May you stand firm against him and endure for the sake of the sheep and the glory of Christ, the Chief Shepherd.

Ben Simpson is pastor of West Main Baptist Church in Alexandria, Tenn. Get Baptist Press headlines and breaking news on Twitter, Facebook, and in your email.

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Publication date: August 22, 2012