In The Golden Compass, Lyra and her companions free the children held at this experimental station in the North and destroy it.  In The Amber Spyglass, Lyra and Will reverse the story of the Edenic Fall by consummating a sexual act in the garden.

Again, Pullman is not subtle.  Keep in mind that this is a series of books marketed to children and adolescents.  Lyra puts a red fruit to Will's lips and Will "knew at once what she meant, and that he was too joyful to speak."  Within moments, the 13-year olds are involved in some kind of unspecified sexual act.

"The word love set his nerves ablaze," Pullman writes of Will.  "All his body thrilled with it, and he answered her in the same words, kissing her hot face over and over again, drinking in with adoration the scent of her body and her warm, honey-fragrant hair and her sweet, moist mouth that tasted of the little red fruit."

Just a few pages later, Will and Lyra will dare to touch each other's daemon.  That passage is even more sexually charged and explicit than the first.  The adolescents now know "that neither daemon would change now, having felt a lover's hands on them.  These were their shapes for life: they would want no other."

What is it about Pullman and C. S. Lewis?

Put simply, Pullman hates C. S. Lewis's work The Chronicles of Narnia.  He told Hannah Rosin that Lewis's famous work is "morally loathsome" and "one of the most ugly and poisonous things I ever read."  Narnia, he said, "is the Christian one . . . .  And mine is the non-Christian."

When the first Narnia film was released in 2005, Pullman described the books as "a peevish blend of racist, misogynistic and reactionary prejudice."

Indeed, Pullman's His Dark Materials is intended as an answer to Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia.  What Lewis (and J. R. R. Tolkein) did for Christianity, Pullman wants to do for atheism.

So, what should Christians do?

A good first step would be to take a deep breath.  The Christian faith is not about to be toppled by a film, nor by a series of fantasy books.  Pullman has an agenda that is clear, and Christians need to inform themselves of what this agenda is and what it means.  At the same time, nothing would serve his agenda better than to have Christians speaking recklessly or unintelligently about the film or the books.

This is about the battle of ideas and worldviews.  While Christians will not celebrate the release of this film, we should recognize the mixture of challenge and opportunity that comes with millions of persons watching this film and talking about the issues it raises.  When the movie is mentioned in the workplace, in school, on the playground, or in the college campus, this is a great opportunity to show that Christians are not afraid of the battle of ideas.

We should recognize that the Christian Church has some very embarrassing moments in its history - moments when it has failed to represent the truth of the Gospel and the love of Christ.  Authors like Philip Pullman take advantage of these failures in order to paint the entire Christian Church as a conspiracy against human happiness and freedom.  Of course, that charge will not stand close scrutiny, and we can face it head-on with a thoughtful response.

Some Christians have also held very unhelpful views of human sexuality.  These, we must admit, would include figures as great and influential as Augustine and, alas, C. S. Lewis.  But these figures, rightly influential in other areas of the faith, are not representative in this case of biblical sexuality.  We can set the record straight.

Should we be concerned that people, young and old, will be confused by this movie?  Of course.  But I do not believe that a boycott will dissuade the general public from seeing the film.  I am very concerned when I think of so many people being entertained by such a subversive message delivered by such a seductive medium.  We are responsible to show them, in so far as we are able, that the Magisterium of The Golden Compass is not a fair or accurate representation of the Christian Church.