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Sneak is One Satisfying Sequel

  • Christa Banister Crosswalk.com Contributing Writer
  • 2013 2 Feb
  • COMMENTS
<i>Sneak</i> is One Satisfying Sequel

 

Author: Evan Angler
Title: Sneak
Publisher: Thomas Nelson

Finally, dystopian fiction with a decidedly apocalyptic spin has gotten deliciously readable.

While Evan Angler’s Swipe introduced readers to a fascinating futuristic new world that feels real, Sneak seriously ups the ante with thrilling suspense, political intrigue and a thoroughly engaging protagonist.    

At 13, an age where conforming is practically a survival tactic, Logan Langley backs out of doing what’s culturally acceptable now—getting the Mark, which allows the masses to shop, go to school, get medical care, you know, survive like any regular person.

Now on the run, thanks to government agents who’ll stop at nothing, and I mean nothing, to capture Logan for breaking the rules, another satisfying layer to the story is that Logan is also in search of his sister Lily who disappeared on her 13th birthday—the time she was supposed to get the Mark.

Fast-paced and engaging from beginning to end, Swipe has plenty of payoff as the pages tick on by. And like Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games, you can’t help being invested in Logan’s quest, the mark of a truly memorable character.

Since Sneak is released by a major Christian publisher, Thomas Nelson, one might automatically assume that the aforementioned Mark has something to do with the one mentioned in the Bible. But that connection isn’t really made too much in Sneak. Instead, the Mark is basically the key to freedom and self-sufficiency—the moment when you’re no longer being supported by your family.

Providing readers not just with entertainment but insightful food for thought, there are moments where Sneak is downright frightening. In fact, it’s hard to believe that it’s for a younger audience sometimes. But with compared with today’s far more disposable entertainment options, it’s nice seeing a story with a point—and Sneak definitely has that.

Following the ol’ showbiz adage of “always leaving the audience wanting more,” it also can’t help make avid readers eager to see what Angler has up his sleeve next.

*This Article First Published 2/27/2013