Rock music is back, and Australia's Paul Colman Trio (PC3) is helping to spearhead the revival, driven by a culture-engaging philosophy: "We are meant to be leaders in relationships, politics and art, yet we are often on the fringe rather than the cutting edge," the band writes. PC3's New Map of the World is a leading example of how to take on unbelief with music that's relevant but not preachy.

Turn, the album's opening song, grabs the listener then shakes him with lyrics that are direct and timely: The world can't "turn around" until the church does first.

As energetic as the trio's music can be, PC3 can take it down nicely, too. Sun-Stars-Moon, the first breather on the album, isn't sappy musically or lyrically. However, the soft Love Me More, which blossoms into a harmonious chorus, loses its way late in the going, pouring on the orchestration and becoming too heavy-handed.

The harder tunes on Map make the strongest impression. Selfish Song is a release of rage against the sin in each heart, which can be remedied only through the grace of God. The driving I Dream begins with a strumming acoustic guitar that builds to an electric chorus, telling the story of time wasted, truth discovered and the return of a prodigal.

Key to the band's success is Colman's smooth voice, which communicates longing, resignation and joy without the anger or disenchantment that goes hand-in-hand with most contemporary rock music.

The trio just wrapped a tour with Third Day and will be back on the road with the band this fall, but if this record is any indication, it won't be long before PC3 is headlining a tour of its own in the States.