aims to offer the most compelling biblically-based content to Christians on their walk with Jesus. is your online destination for all areas of Christian Living – faith, family, fun, and community. Each category is further divided into areas important to you and your Christian faith including Bible study, daily devotions, marriage, parenting, movie reviews, music, news, and more.

Christian Music - Reviews, News, Interviews

The King in a Rookery

  • reviewed by Christa Banister Copyright Christianity Today International
  • 2006 1 Nov
The King in a Rookery
Sounds like … melodic pop/rock that's similar to The Elms, Snow Patrol, Jimmy Eat World and at times, MaeAt a glance … while there are some forgettable tracks, the band has clearly invested more in its sound and lyrics this time aroundTrack Listing End of the Line Hello Monday One Goodbye It's Our Time Everything's OK Long Way Down I'm Alive The Deal Here & Now Final Straw Gravity I Concede

After a mostly forgettable debut, Under Museum Quality Glass on BEC Records back in 2003, Pivitplex returns with a new five-member lineup, smarter lyrics and a retooled sound on the much-delayed The King in a Rookery (the original release date was back in February).

And while things don't exactly get off to a promising start with the lagging, six-minute opener "End of the Line," it doesn't take long to hear significant improvement in light of its predecessor. Instead of favoring the sound of other middle-of-the-road melodic rock bands, Pivitplex carves out its own place in the genre with more of a lo-fi, Indie rock approach that works really well, especially on catchy anthems like "Hello Monday," "One Goodbye," and the best of the bunch, "Everything's OK."

In addition to more musical variety, the band's lyrics have also come a long way. Continuing the Switchfoot-esque search for significance and meaning in an uncertain world, Pivitplex offers a fresh perspective, particularly on the poignant "It's Our Time": "We're a part of a generation of massive dreams/And hair-brained schemes of love/There are people who stand in line/To freeze our minds and say it's not our time/Will you stand with me, will you sing with me?"

While there are weak moments with the cliché-ridden "Final Straw" and "Here & Now," the band has a knack for relating to its peers and also demonstrates an unexpected aptitude for writing an atmospheric modern worship song that's nothing short of beautiful with "I'm Alive."

Ultimately, it's this diversity in style and substance that will leave a lasting impression when the last song of a The King in a Rookery has been played. Now here's hoping for even more moments like that the next time Pivitplex records a project.

© Christa Banister, subject to licensing agreement with Christianity Today International. All rights reserved. Click for reprint information.