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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

June 2011 - Update on Teen Media Behavior

  • Jim Liebelt
    Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family at Azusa Pacific University. Jim has over 25 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, and has been on the HomeWord staff since 1998. He has served over the years as a pastor, author, youth ministry trainer, adjunct college instructor and speaker. Jim’s culture blog and parenting articles appear on HomeWord.com. Jim is a contributing author of culture and parenting articles to Crosswalk.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Olympia, WA.
  • 2011 Jun 23
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The Nielsen Company has released a report that provides extensive information on the current landscape pertaining to teen media behavior. Too much info for this post, but click-through to the source article for more in-depth information. Here's a summary of the findings:

Today's teens:

• Are the heaviest mobile video viewers of all age groups.
• Are more receptive to mobile advertising than other age groups.
• Out-text all other age groups. Teens 13-17 send an average of 3,364 texts per month, more than doubling the rate of the next active age group (18-24).
• Talk less on the phone than other age groups. Only seniors 65-plus talk on their phones less.
• Are social media mavens. 78.7 percent visit social networking sites.
• Watch less TV than the general population, watching less than other age groups. Still, teen TV viewing has increased 6% over the past five years.
• Love the Internet, but spend less time browsing than other age groups.

Source: Center for Media Research
http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=152661