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Joe McKeever Christian Blog and Commentary

How to Give to the Lord

  • Joe McKeever
    Joe McKeever says he has written dozens of books, but has published none. That refers to the 1,000+ articles on various subjects (prayer, leadership, church, pastors) that can be found on his website -- joemckeever.com -- and which are reprinted by online publications everywhere. His articles appear in a number of textbooks and other collections. Retired from "official" ministry since the summer of 2009, Joe stays busy drawing a daily cartoon for Baptist Press (www.bpnews.net), as an adjunct professor at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, writing for Baptist MenOnline for the North American Mission Board, and preaching/drawing/etc for conventions and churches across America. Over a 42 year period, McKeever pastored 6 churches (the last three were the First Baptist Churches of Columbus, MS; Charlotte, NC; and Kenner, LA). Followed by 5 years as Director of Missions for the 135 SBC churches of metro New Orleans, during which hurricane katrina devastated the city and destroyed many churches. Joe is married to Margaret, the father of three adults, and the proud grandfather of eight terrific young people. He holds degrees from Birmingham-Southern College (History, 1962), and New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary (Masters in Church History, 1967, and Doctorate of Ministry in Evangelism, 1973). Joe's father was a coal miner who married a farmer's daughter. Carl and Lois McKeever, both of whom lived past 95 years of age, produced 6 children, with Joe and Ronnie being ministers. Joe grew up near Nauvoo, Alabama, and attended high school at Double Springs. Joe's life verse is Job 4:4, "Your words have stood men on their feet."
  • 2018 May 16
  • Comments

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When we give to the Lord, so many things can go wrong. The world looks askance at it, even friends wonder about all the money we’re giving, and so many questions arise.

I call it a delicate art, this business of giving to the Lord. Here are some reasons for that.

1. It doesn’t look like what it is.

It may appear you are giving to poor people, to the needy, to the gospel worker, or the church itself. Someone may even say you’re “paying the preacher.” One of my uncles said on one occasion, “I don’t figure I owe the preacher anything; I’ve not been to hear him preach in ages.”

In truth, I am laying up treasure in Heaven (Matthew 6:20), I am ministering to the saints (2 Corinthians 9:1), I am honoring my Lord by my faithfulness (see Mark 12:41-44), and I am honoring His name (see Hebrews 6:10).

2. Outsiders will accuse you of wasting your money.

Judas said, “What a waste!” (see Mark 14:4). He was a thief, say the gospel writers, and cared little for the honor of the Lord.

3. The art of giving to the Lord is so easily abused by the unscrupulous.

Jesus said it is more blessed to give than to receive (Acts 20:35). We’ve all heard preachers on radio and television turn that on its head and urge us to give to them so that we might reap a blessing. If they really believed the Lord, they’d be sending us the money!

Unfortunately, we know of pastors who will not ask for money or preach on money because they fear some will accuse them of the wrong motives. In so doing, they fail their people big time.

4. It achieves something we may not see in our lifetime.

Proper and generous giving to Christian workers may achieve changes in the hearts and lives of people, transformations in homes and communities, and complete turnabouts in nations. As a rule, however, they will not know. Humanly speaking, there’s no way to calculate whose offering bought the Bibles for the children in Tanzania, built the church in Singapore, or paid for the gasoline for the gospel worker’s moped in Malawi. God knows.

The Mississippi River, we’re told, drains a basin reaching from Western New York State into Eastern Montana. When it flows past New Orleans, you can walk off the levee into the water and dip your finger in. As a drop falls from your finger, it would be humanly impossible to say where that drop first hit the ground–Billings, Montana or Lake Otasca, Minnesota, or Utica, New York. But God knows.

5. It’s done on earth but has eternal, spiritual, and heavenly dimensions.

When we give to the Lord’s work, God is pleased and Jesus is honored, and the Holy Spirit is able to put the gifts to work in the spreading of the gospel. When we do this, God takes note and promises us, “You will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous” (Luke 14:14).

6. It transfers earthly possessions into heavenly treasures.

A divine alchemy.

Alchemy was the faux science of the Middle Ages whereby people tried (or claimed) to change base metals into gold. Fortunately, they never learned to pull that off. But there is a strong sense in which we take earth’s treasures and transfer them into the currency of Heaven.

7. It can be done silently, even secretly, with no fanfare and no one else knowing.

I’ve been the recipient of anonymous gifts and have arranged to give a few to servants of the Lord over the years. It’s a wonderful thing.

8. It is deceptively simple and usually unimpressive to the unspiritual.

It might be something so small as a cup of cold water in the name of a disciple (Matthew 10:40).

A check written and mailed. A small gift to the needy or even to the undeserving.

9. It’s open to abuse personally.

I can give for all the wrong reasons, and I alone would know. I could be giving to impress others, to gain favor with someone, or to earn a reward in Heaven. We recall how our Lord told how hypocrites pray and give and fast for all the wrong reasons but mostly “to be seen of men.” In each case, He said, “They have their reward.” (Matthew 6:2,5,16). That is, they have all the reward they’re going to get.

Look at the delicate offering made by the widow of Mark chapter 12…

–She never knew that the Lord saw her deed that day.

–She never knew that He was honored by her gift.

–She never knew that He honored her above all the others that day. She made honorable mention in Holy Scripture!

–She never knew her gift would inspire millions to give millions in the future.

So, when you and I bring our gift to the Lord, we never know…

–What the gift will mean to the Lord.

–What God will do with our gift.

–What our gift will mean to our eternal existence.

–How God will inspire others with our example.

So, we give by faith. Luke 18:8 We do so knowing the practice can be abused, knowing that we are handing money to flawed humans who may or may not use the gift wisely (when the widow of Mark 12 gave her offering, the temple was under the control of “a den of thieves” (Mark 11:17).

We give out of love to our Lord. We give generously, and make it our aim to give more generously. And when we come to the end of our days, we may decide that–in the words of one who had given generously, then lost his wealth in a depression–“the only thing I have left is what I gave away.”

Lord, help us to honor Thee with our giving.

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