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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Jim Liebelt

Jim Liebelt's Blog

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on HealthDay.

The suicide attempt rate has risen by as much as half among teenage girls during the coronavirus pandemic, a new government study shows.

Emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among girls between the ages of 12 and 17 increased by 26% during summer 2020 and by 50% during winter 2021, compared with the same periods in 2019, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. However, ER trips related to suspected suicide attempts among boys of the same age and young adults aged 18 to 25 remained stable during the pandemic.

"The findings from this study suggest more severe distress among young females than has been identified in previous reports during the pandemic, reinforcing the need for increased attention to, and prevention for, this population," concluded the report published in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Self-reported suicide attempts are consistently higher among teen girls than boys, and research prior to the pandemic indicated that girls had higher and increasing rates of emergency department visits related to suicide attempts than boys, the CDC scientists noted.

Young girls might have been more affected by the pandemic due to lockdowns that broke their connectedness to schools, teachers, and friends, the study speculated.

The researchers noted a 31% increase in the proportion of mental health-related emergency department visits that occurred among teenagers in 2020, compared with the year before.

At the same time, there's been no significant increase in suicide deaths among teenage girls during the pandemic.

Source: HealthDay
https://consumer.healthday.com/b-6-11-suicide-attempts-jumped-51-for-u-s-teen-girls-during-lockdowns-2653325226.html

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on HealthDay.

When it comes to teens, one risky driving behavior may beget other risky behaviors on the road: New research finds that those who use cellphones while behind the wheel are more likely to engage in other types of risky driving.

"This study found that frequent cellphone use while driving was only one indicator of a more general pattern of risky driving practices associated with prior crashes in young drivers," said study author Elizabeth Walshe, a research scientist at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).

"Assessment of personality traits, such as impulsivity and sensation-seeking, may be helpful to identify drivers most at risk in order to provide more targeted interventions promoting safe driving," Walshe said in a hospital news release.

The findings suggest that efforts to promote safe driving in teens and young adults should address all types of risky driving associated with impulsivity, the researchers said.

Their study included 384 young drivers (ages 18-24) from across the United States who completed an online survey that assessed their risky driving practices, as well as their history of crashes and impulse-related personality traits.

About 44% of the drivers said they'd been in at least one crash, and 73% reported cellphone use while driving.

Those who used cellphones while behind the wheel were more likely to report other risky driving behaviors such as speeding, aggressive passing, and running red lights.

While cellphone use while driving was not uniquely associated with crashes, it was one of several risky activities related to crashes, according to the study published recently in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Source: HealthDay
https://consumer.healthday.com/b-6-14-why-some-youth-are-more-prone-to-text-while-driving-2653320836.html

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on StudyFinds.

A new study is putting into perspective just how hard COVID-19 quarantines have been for American families. Researchers find it’s been more than seven and a half months since the average grandparent has seen all their grandchildren in person.

The survey of 2,000 American grandparents reveals, because of the pandemic, 59 percent have spent less time with their grandchildren during the past year. Of those, four in five said the hardest part of the pandemic was not seeing their grandchildren as often as they usually would.

Moreover, 77 percent of those who’ve spent less time with their grandchildren said it was difficult not being able to watch their children’s kids grow up in person over the past year.

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Motel 6, researchers also found the majority of respondents have a unique relationship with each of their grandchildren. However, it’s been more difficult to cultivate those bonds during the ongoing health crisis. That’s especially true for the two in five who had a new grandbaby born over the past year (42%).

Two-thirds (69%) of those with a new grandchild said that what they’re looking forward to most is meeting them for the very first time. Regardless of whether they have a new family member or not, three in five grandparents (59%) plan to spend more time with their grandchildren in the coming year than ever before.

Source: StudyFinds
https://www.studyfinds.org/grandparents-havent-seen-grandkids/

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