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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Jim Liebelt

Jim Liebelt's Blog

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on MedicalXpress.

Have you ever received an unexpected kindness? A stranger in the car ahead of you paid your highway toll. Or a kind consumer picked up your tab at Starbucks. These actions can set off a chain reaction of kindness, as you pay that kindness forward to the next unsuspecting person in line.

But when does this pay-it-forward mentality first emerge in humans? New research at the University of Virginia found that the phenomenon is first seen in four-year-olds.

In a pair of studies, experimenters worked with two groups. In the first study, three- and four-year-olds were called into a room individually and shown a transparent, locked box containing five enticing, colorful animal stickers. The experimenter then told each child a previous toddler—let's call her Sally—left a note sharing the location of the key to the box, which was hidden in the room. After finding the key, opening the box and collecting their treasures, the toddlers were asked by the experimenter if they would like to share some of their stickers with a new child.

The results were clear. Most of the three-year-olds (80%) did not want to share, while most of the four-year-olds—about 60% of them—did. The study's lead author, Stefen Beeler-Duden, a graduate psychology student, calls this generosity "upstream reciprocity."

In the second study, Beeler-Duden set out to learn what was driving the upstream reciprocity in the four-year-olds. Beeler-Duden broke down gratitude into two key parts: the gift itself and the actions of the person who provided the gift. So Beeler-Duden replicated the sticker experiment with a new group of four-year-olds and then asked them to evaluate Sally, the mysterious helper. Was she good, bad or just OK? He found that the children who positively evaluated Sally shared more stickers. It was, he said, "something like the emotional experience of gratitude."

"Moreover, children's positive evaluations of Sally were correlated with children's upstream reciprocity, that is, how many stickers they shared with the new child," reads part of the new study, published in the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.

So why are four-year-olds more likely than three-year-olds to share their animal stickers?

"It seems that four-year-olds are really paying attention to these different components that are associated with gratitude, noticing not only that they received something nice, but also that this person wanted to help them," Beeler-Duden said, "whereas it seems that three-year-olds are not necessarily tuned fully into these different components just yet."

"It also may be that our sticker game was a little bit too difficult for three-year-olds because there's a lot to keep track of."

Source: MedicalXpress
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-02-generosity-year-olds-kindness.html

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on ScienceDaily.

A study published online as an accepted paper in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found that later school start times were associated with a significant drop in vehicle accidents involving teen drivers.

Researchers analyzed motor vehicle accident statistics involving adolescents in Fairfax County, Virginia, for two school years before and after the implementation of later school start times. Results show that the crash rate in 16-to-18-year-old licensed drivers decreased significantly from 31.63 to 29.59 accidents per 1,000 drivers after the delayed start time. In contrast, the teen crash rate remained steady throughout the rest of the state.

"Accidental injuries including motor vehicle crashes are the number one cause of deaths of adolescents in the U.S., and anything we can do to mitigate that risk should be considered," said senior study author Dr. Judith Owens, MPH, professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and director of sleep medicine at Boston Children's Hospital. "We know from independent data sources that after a change in school start times students get more sleep, which leads to multiple benefits, not just for individuals but also in terms of huge economic implications."

The study compared motor vehicle crash rates among adolescents in the differing school start times in Fairfax County, which in the fall of 2015 pushed back school start times by 50 minutes from 7:20 a.m. to 8:10 a.m. Data also were compared to teenage crashes in the rest of the state, where school start times did not change. The analysis also found that the later school start time was associated with a lower rate of distraction-related accidents.

"Teenagers who get more sleep are less likely to make poor decisions such as not wearing a seat belt or engaging in distracted driving," explained Owens. "One of the potential mechanisms for this reduction in car crashes is a decrease in behaviors that are related to risk-taking."

Source: ScienceDaily
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200218125312.htm

Trending Today on Twitter - 2/21/20
1. #BTSComeback2020
2. #FridayFeeling
3. Jimin
4. #FridayThoughts
5. #FridayVibes
6. #FridayMotivation
7. Vmin
8. Taehyung
9. My Time
10. Doug Collins
Source: Twitter

Trending Today on Google - 2/21/20
1. Ozzy Osbourne Ordinary Man
2. Hunters
3. Quaden
4. Contigo recall
5. Mike Fiers
6. Roberto Gomez Bolanos
7. Roger Stone
8. Fortnite Season 2
9. Europa League
10. Kyrie Irving
Source: Google

Apple Music Top 10 Singles - 2/21/20
1. The Box - Roddy Ricch
2. Numbers (feat. Roddy Ricch, Gunna and London On Da Track) - A Boogie wit da Hoodie
3. After Hours - The Weeknd
4. Life Is Good (feat. Drake) - Future
5. Dior - Pop Smoke
6. High Fashion (feat. Mustard) - Roddy Ricch
7. Intentions (feat. Quavo) - Justin Bieber
8. Shake the Room (feat. Quavo) - Pop Smoke
9. Blinding Lights - The Weeknd
10. Sum 2 Prove - Lil Baby
Source: Apple Music

TV Shows Trending on Streaming Services - 2/21/20
1. Locke & Key - Netflix
2. Narcos: Mexico - Netflix
3. The Stranger - Netflix
4. Kidding - Showtime
5. Star Trek: Picard - CBS
6. The Witcher - Netflix
7. YOU - Netflix
8. Mythic Quest: Raven's Banquet - Apple TV+
9. LEGO Masters - Hulu
10. The Unicorn - CBS
Source: Reelgood

Trending Today on YouTube - 2/21/20
1. BTS 'ON' Kinetic Manifesto Film: Come Prima
2. Why I Left
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4. Lil Tjay - Forever Pop
5. Animal Crossing: New Horizons Direct 2.20.2020
Source: YouTube

Top 5 Movies - Last Weekend
1. Sonic the Hedgehog
2. Birds of Prey (And The Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)
3. Fantasy Island
4. The Photograph
5. Bad Boys for Life
Source: Rotten Tomatoes

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