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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Jim Liebelt

Jim Liebelt's Blog

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on HealthDay.

Teenagers who constantly use their smartphones may have a heightened risk of developing symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, a new study suggests.

The findings offer a look at a question many parents may have: Can those ubiquitous digital devices -- and their constant pull on kids' attention -- cause mental or behavioral issues?

The answer, the study authors said, is "maybe."

The researchers found that teens who used their devices "many times" a day were at increased risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms over the next two years.

Around 10 percent reported new problems with attention, focus or being still, which are hallmarks of ADHD. That compared with less than 5 percent of their peers who kept their device use to a minimum.

But the findings do not prove that digital media are to blame, said Dr. Jenny Radesky, who wrote an editorial published with the study.

There are many other factors that could affect teenagers' likelihood of reporting those symptoms, said Radesky, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Michigan.

The researchers accounted for the factors they could -- such as family income and whether kids had depression symptoms, smoked or used drugs or alcohol at the outset.

But there were things the researchers couldn't measure, Radesky said.

A key missing piece, she said, is how parents influenced their kids. Teens who were not glued to their phones might have had parents who set more rules at home -- or encouraged their kids to have "positive activities" that fostered their mental development.

That said, Radesky called the study important.

"It's one of the first to be able to look at this question longitudinally," she said, meaning it followed the same group of teens over time.

So, it was able to show that the higher rate of ADHD symptoms came after -- not before -- the heavy device use.

Media distractions -- from TV to music to video games -- are nothing new. But mobile technology is different, said lead researcher Adam Leventhal.

"It's the unrelenting access and constant engagement throughout the day," said Leventhal, a professor at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, in Los Angeles.

It's possible, he explained, that when kids get used to that constant stimulation, they could develop problems with patience or "tolerating a delay in gratification."

The researchers found that teens who used their devices "many times" a day were at increased risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms over the next two years.

Around 10 percent reported new problems with attention, focus or being still, which are hallmarks of ADHD. That compared with less than 5 percent of their peers who kept their device use to a minimum.

But the findings do not prove that digital media are to blame, said Dr. Jenny Radesky, who wrote an editorial published with the study.

There are many other factors that could affect teenagers' likelihood of reporting those symptoms, said Radesky, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Michigan.

The researchers accounted for the factors they could -- such as family income and whether kids had depression symptoms, smoked or used drugs or alcohol at the outset.

But there were things the researchers couldn't measure, Radesky said.

A key missing piece, she said, is how parents influenced their kids. Teens who were not glued to their phones might have had parents who set more rules at home -- or encouraged their kids to have "positive activities" that fostered their mental development.

That said, Radesky called the study important.

"It's one of the first to be able to look at this question longitudinally," she said, meaning it followed the same group of teens over time.

So, it was able to show that the higher rate of ADHD symptoms came after -- not before -- the heavy device use.

Media distractions -- from TV to music to video games -- are nothing new. But mobile technology is different, said lead researcher Adam Leventhal.

"It's the unrelenting access and constant engagement throughout the day," said Leventhal, a professor at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, in Los Angeles.

It's possible, he explained, that when kids get used to that constant stimulation, they could develop problems with patience or "tolerating a delay in gratification."

The findings were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Source: HealthDay
https://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/attention-deficit-disorder-adhd-news-50/can-smartphones-trigger-adhd-symptoms-in-teens-735856.html

Trending Today on Twitter - 7/27/18
1. #FridayFeeling
2. Nick Jonas
3. #OddThingsToCollect
4. #CarrFire
5. #FlashbackFriday
6. #FridayMotivation
7. Priyanka Chopra
8. OITNB
9. Trump to Moscow
10. DT Adam Reth
Source: Twitter

Trending Today on Google - 7/27/18
1. Valerie Jarret
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5. Treasure Map In Flush Factory
6. AMZN
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8. Mission Impossible
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Source: Google

iTunes Top 10 Singles - 7/27/18
1. In My Feelings - Drake
2. Sober - Demi Lovato
3. Natural - Imagine Dragons
4. I Like It - Cardi B, Bad Bunny & J Balvin
5. Girls Like You (feat. Cardi B) - Maroon 5
6. FEFE (feat. Nicki Minaj & Murda Beatz) - 6ix9ine
7. In My Feelings - Drake
8. Better Now - Post Malone
9. Simple - Florida Georgia Line
10. You Say - Lauren Daigle
Source: iTunes

Top 10 TV (Broadcast) Shows - Week Ending 7/22/18
1. America's Got Talent
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Source: Rotten Tomatoes

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on PsychCentral.

Medications for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), such as Adderall, may not improve cognition in healthy students and may actually impair working memory, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and Brown University.

When administered to healthy (non-ADHD) college students, the standard 30 mg dose of Adderall did in fact improve attention, mood and focus — typical results from a stimulant — but these effects failed to translate to better performance on a battery of neurocognitive tasks that measured short-term memory, reading comprehension and fluency.

The findings, recently published in the journal Pharmacy, surprised the researchers.

“We hypothesized that Adderall would enhance cognition in the healthy students, but instead, the medication did not improve reading comprehension or fluency, and it impaired working memory,” said Dr. Lisa Weyandt, professor of psychology and a faculty member with URI’s George and Anne Ryan Institute for Neuroscience.

“Not only are they not benefiting from it academically, but it could be negatively affecting their performance.”

Weyandt conducted the study with Dr. Tara White, assistant professor of research in behavioral and social sciences at Brown University. Their study is the first multi-site experiment investigating the impact of so-called “study drugs” on college students who do not have ADHD.

It comes at a time when use of prescription stimulants such as Adderall, Ritalin and Vyvanse is common among young adults who believe the drugs enhance their academic performance. Research has estimated that 5 to 35 percent of college students in the United States and European countries without ADHD illegally use these controlled substances, buying or receiving them from peers, friends, or family.

Weyandt has a theory about why working memory would be negatively impacted by the medication: Brain scan research shows that a person with ADHD tends to show less neural activity in brain regions that control executive function — working memory, attention, self-control. For those with ADHD, Adderall and similar medications increase activity in those regions and appear to normalize functioning.

“If your brain is functioning normally in those regions, the medication is unlikely to have a positive effect on cognition and my actually impair cognition. In other words, you need to have a deficit to benefit from the medicine,” Weyandt said.

The study participants also reported their perceived effects of the drug and its impact on their emotions, with students reporting significant elevation of their mood when taking Adderall.

In contrast to the small, mixed effects on cognition, Adderall had much larger effects on mood and bodily responses, increasing positive mood, emotional ratings of the drug effect, heart rate and blood pressure.

“These are classic effects of psychostimulants,” said White. “The fact that we see these effects on positive emotion and cardiovascular activity, in the same individuals for whom cognitive effects were small or negative in direction, is important.”

“It indicates that the cognitive and the emotional impact of these drugs are separate. How you feel under the drug does not necessarily mean that there is an improvement in cognition; there can be a decrease, as seen here in young adults without ADHD.”

Source: PsychCentral
https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/07/24/study-adderall-fails-to-boost-cognition-in-healthy-college-students/137238.html

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