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Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Jim Liebelt

Jim Liebelt's Blog

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on HealthDay.

An epidemic of vaping by American teenagers shows no signs of stopping, with 2019 data finding more than a quarter (27.5%) of high school students using e-cigarettes.

The rate was somewhat lower, but still troubling, among middle school kids -- about 1 in every 10 vaped, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And just as happens with traditional cigarettes, the nicotine found in e-cigarettes can hook teens for a lifetime, with uncertain results for their health.

"Our nation's youth are becoming increasingly exposed to nicotine, a drug that is highly addictive and can harm brain development," CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield said in an agency news release.

There was a small bit of good news from the new 2019 data: Only 5.8% of high school kids and 2.3% of middle school students smoke traditional cigarettes.

But when all sources of nicotine -- vaping, cigarettes, pipes, cigars, hookah and smokeless tobacco -- are added up, about 1 in every 3 high school students (4.7 million) and about 1 in 8 middle school students (1.5 million) use some kind of tobacco-derived product, the CDC said.

For the sixth year in a row, e-cigarettes were the most widely used tobacco product among high school and middle school students, the report found.

But there was one glimmer of hope: The new report found that almost 58% of current middle and high school students who use tobacco products said they were seriously thinking about quitting all tobacco products, and 57.5% said they'd stopped using all tobacco products for one or more days because they were trying to quit.

The new data was published Dec. 5, 2019, in the CDC's journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on ScienceDaily.

Sleep problems, fatigue and attention difficulties in the weeks after a child's concussion injury could be a sign of reduced brain function and decreased grey matter.

Researchers from The University of Queensland have studied persistent concussion symptoms and their link to poorer recovery outcomes in children.

UQ Child Health Research Centre Research Fellow Dr. Kartik Iyer said information from the study could help parents and doctors assess the risk of long-term disability.

"In the MRI scans of children with persistent concussion symptoms, poor sleep was linked to decreases in brain grey matter and reduced brain function," Dr. Iyer said.

"Identifying decreases in brain function can allow us to predict if a child will recover properly.

"This knowledge can help clinicians ensure a child receives targeted rehabilitation such as cognitive behavior therapy, medication to improve sleep, or safe and new emerging therapies such as non-invasive brain stimulation to potentially reduce symptoms."

Researchers were able to predict with 86 percent accuracy how decreases in brain function impacted recovery two months post-concussion.

"Generally, children with persistent concussion symptoms will have alterations to their visual, motor and cognitive brain regions but we don't have a clear understanding of how this develops and how it relates to future recovery," Dr. Iyer said.

"It can have a serious impact on their return to normal activities, including time away from school, difficulties with memory and attentiveness, disturbances to sleeping habits and changes to mood -- all of which affect healthy brain development."

Most children recover fully after a concussion, but one in 10 has persistent symptoms.

"It is critical that children who receive a head injury see a doctor and get professional medical advice soon after their injury has occurred," he said.

Source: ScienceDaily
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/12/191202102046.htm

Trending Today on Twitter - 12/6/19
1. #FridayFeeling
2. #FridayMotivation
3. NAS Pensacola
4. Pensacola
5. #FridayThoughts
6. #JobsReport
7. Roddy Ricch
8. #powertrip
9. John Barron
10. French Montana
Source: Twitter

Trending Today on Google - 12/6/19
1. Kylie Rae Harris
2. Bruins
3. Alexandra Grant
4. UPS driver
5. Nanci Pelosi
6. Camila Cabello Romance
7. Mulan
8. V Wars
9. Aaliyah
10. YouTube Rewind 2019
Source: Google

Apple Music Top 10 Singles - 12/6/19
1. Heartless - The Weeknd
2. Woah - Lil Baby
3. Blinding Lights - The Weeknd
4. BOP - DaBaby
5. Roxanne - Arizona Zervas
6. HIGHEST IN THE ROOM - Travis Scott
7. Ballin' (feat. Roddy Ricch) - Mustard
8. Falling - Trevor Daniel
9. everything i wanted - Billie Eilish
10. Bandit - Juice WRLD & YoungBoy Never Broke Again
Source: Apple Music

Top 10 TV (Cable) Shows - Week Ending 12/1/19
1. Monday Night Football Baltimore v LA Rams
2. Monday Night Kickoff
3. Hallmark Original Movie: Christmas Town
4. Hallmark Original Movie: Christmas in Rome
5. Hannity - Tues
6. Hannity - Wed
7. Tucker Carlson Tonight - Tues
8. Tucker Carlson Tonight - Mon
9. Curse of Oak Island
10. Rachel Maddow Show - Mon
Source: TV By The Numbers

Trending Today on YouTube - 12/6/19
1. YouTube Rewind 2019: For the Record
2. Disney's Mulan Official Trailer
3. I Ordered Pizza And Tipped The House
4. Billie Eilish - xanny
5. I Tried Wedding Dresses Through History
Source: YouTube

Top 5 Movies - Last Weekend
1. Frozen II
2. Knives Out
3. Ford v Ferrari
4. Queen & Slim
5. A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
Source: Rotten Tomatoes

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