Crosswalk.com aims to offer the most compelling biblically-based content to Christians on their walk with Jesus. Crosswalk.com is your online destination for all areas of Christian Living – faith, family, fun, and community. Each category is further divided into areas important to you and your Christian faith including Bible study, daily devotions, marriage, parenting, movie reviews, music, news, and more.

Jim Liebelt Christian Blog and Commentary

Jim Liebelt

Jim Liebelt's Blog

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on Study Finds.

A study by researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) finds children who don’t get enough sleep at night have a greater risk of developing mental health problems like depression and anxiety when they’re older.

The study by Bror M. Ranum, an NTNU Department of Psychology fellow, follows nearly 800 children over several years to measure sleeping habits and the onset of psychiatric difficulties.

“We’re seeing an association between sleep duration and risk of symptoms of emotional and behavioral disorders,” Ranum reports in a media release.

The study reveals boys who sleep fewer hours than recommended develop an increased risk of manifesting behavioral issues. Boys and girls who get less sleep also have greater risks of emotional problems. The Norwegian study focuses on sleep time, not sleep quality.

Ranum makes it clear that there are often wide differences between individual sleep needs. What is too little sleep for one child could be more than normal for others.

“But if you find that your child seems to be under the weather and can’t concentrate, or you notice their mood fluctuate more than normal, then you may want to help them get more sleep,” Ranum recommends.

The study authors conclude that while parents don’t need to worry unnecessarily, adjustments to sleep routines are advisable if parents think their children’s sleep patterns are being disrupted.

The study was published in Pediatric Research.

Source: Study Finds
https://www.studyfinds.org/children-sleep-mental-health-problems/

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on Digital Music News.

Investment bank Piper Sandler publishes a semi-annual study of trends among US teens. The latest study aggregates responses from 9,800 teens across the United States – on a variety of issues. Part of that survey is learning about their digital habits.

Amongst the most important stats for the music industry: TikTok has surpassed Instagram to become the second most-favored social network among teens.

Snapchat still dominates the category, though many respondents said they use two or more listed options. 34% of teens said they used Snapchat, while 29% said they used TikTok. Both are moving well ahead of Instagram, which clocked in with 25%.

The data offers another problematic takeaway for Facebook-owned platforms. Facebook is one of the least-used platforms among the 13-17 teen demographic – less than 3.1% of the demographic uses Facebook. The decline of Instagram further demonstrates that Facebook is slipping with the younger demo.

TikTok, despite all the concerns of a US government ban, has become a cultural force in the United States. Most recently, it’s propelled Fleetwood Mac to the top of the charts, thanks to a fluke viral video. It also helped make the career of Lil Nas X in 2019 – which seems like so long ago. The point is, it looks like Snapchat and TikTok are here to stay (and growing).

Source: Digital Music News
https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2020/10/13/us-teens-prefer-tiktok-over-instagram/

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on MedicalXpress.

Patterns set during childhood can influence adult life profoundly, and exercise habits are no exception. With the U.S. seeing a 20-year trend of increased risk of being overweight or obese among children, there's reason for concern about both short- and long-term effects on health at a population level.

Recent University of Southern California findings—from one of the first empirical studies of physical activity in children based on data collected during the COVID-19 pandemic—suggest that the effects of the outbreak may exacerbate the problem.

Parents reported that children were less physically active and more sedentary during April and May compared to February. Importantly, an existing trend, wherein older kids tend to exercise less than younger ones, worsened during the first months when various lockdowns were put in place to slow the coronavirus's spread.

"It's a pretty big concern that kids get much less physically active as they get older," said lead author Genevieve Dunton, Ph.D., MPH, professor of preventive medicine and psychology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. "We're seeing that, with the pandemic, these declines may be happening steeper and sooner."

The study was published in the journal BMC Public Health.

The study examined physical activity and sedentary behavior in 211 children between the ages of 5 and 13, with participants drawn from 35 states and the District of Columbia.

In April and May, parents and legal guardians completed an online survey. Among the questions, the researchers asked about perceived changes in time spent exercising and time spent sitting, comparing February (before COVID-related lockdowns) to the previous week.

Among parents of children aged 5 to 8, about 54% perceived their children to be exercising somewhat or much less from the pre-COVID period to the early-COVID period, while about 66% of parents of children aged 9 to 13 gave the same answer. About 64% of parents of younger children reported that their kids stayed seated somewhat or much more, compared with 82% among parents of older children.

"This really underscores that COVID-19 may be exacerbating age-related declines in physical activity," Dunton said.

Source: MedicalXpress
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-10-kids-pandemic.html

Follow Crosswalk.com