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Jason Soroski Christian Blog and Commentary

Jason Soroski

Jason Soroski is a homeschool dad and author of A Journey to Bethlehem: Inspiring Thoughts for Christmas and Hope for the New Year. He serves as worship pastor and in Colorado and spends his weekends exploring the Rocky Mountains with his family. Connect on TwitterInstagram, or at JasonSoroski.net.

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“Segregation is a blatant denial of the unity which we all have in Christ Jesus.”

MARTIN LUTHER KING

Unless you live under a rock, you are aware that our nation is burning. Literally.

I have spent some of the morning praying for our nation and the people in it.

Not necessarily praying that our nation 'would turn back to God', but more specifically that the churches of our nation would turn back to God. That we as believers would submit fully to his leading, that we would seek the face of the one who alone can save, that we would bow in humility and beg God to work in us and through us to speak His truth of Justice to a sick and dying world.

I pray that a mighty revival will occur among us that will reveal Christ and Christ alone as the one that can heal a nations and families one soul at a time.

There are some who mock the idea of prayer - that it is just an impotent superstition that changes nothing.

Yet the greatest civil rights leader heavily promoted the idea.

To be a Christian without prayer is no more possible than to be alive without breathing"

MARTIN LUTHER KING

Whenever there is racial discord, it is inevitable that Martin Luther King will be quoted. Over the last week this has certainly been the case. As we seek justice, as we seek equality, his name stands out as the great leader who spent a lifetime fighting that battle the right way.

And winning it.

What we so often forget is that King was a seminary graduate and a Pastor at a local church. Everything he did was grounded in the world view of Christianity. So why do we think we can quote King, emulate King, admire King, and somehow separate the man from his faith - the very thing that made him the man he was? The very thing that drove him to know what was good and what was evil and how to act upon it?

You see, the founding fathers were influenced by the Bible.  The concept of the imago dei (image of God) is the idea that all men have something within them that God injected.  And this gives everyone a uniqueness, a worth, a dignity, and we must never forget this as a nation.  There are no gradations in the image of God.  Every man from a treble white to a bass black are significant on God’s keyboard, precisely because everyone is made in the image of God.”



THE AMERICAN DREAM, MARTIN LUTHER KING (1964)

The most famous protest led by King was the Montgomery Bus Boycott. To protest segregated seating on the buses, King's protest involved...simply not riding the buses. This led to a Supreme Court ruling in 1956 desegregating buses. King's non-violent boycott based in his approach of faith, prayer, perseverance, love and hope achieved a national, wide-scale, systemic change.

And isn't that what we are looking for?

Our world is on fire.

Racial injustice plagues us.

Human slavery exists in greater numbers than at any time in the history of our planet.

We are fighting a battle that we in ourselves are not equipped to win.

Trump is not your problem, nor your solution. Neither is Biden or anyone else.

Our solution, our only solution, is in Christ.

Much like George Floyd, my redeemer died an unjust death as an innocent man.

My redeemer is concerned with injustice because He himself was victim of it. But the victory came, the hope came, when he conquered the grave and offered true life to all who would seek it. In this, we find the solution to our problems. We find the grace and peace and hope to carry us forward.

Martin Luther King knew this, and his actions reflected it.

May we as believers rise up not in the same tired political jargon, nor the arguments of hate, but as the Bride of Christ, comprised of every nation, tribe and tongue, and in steadfast prayer and unity continue work of the Gospel to change hearts, minds and communities.

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Jason Soroski is a homeschool dad and author of A Journey to Bethlehem: Inspiring Thoughts for Christmas and Hope for the New Year. He serves as worship pastor and in Colorado and spends his weekends exploring the Rocky Mountains with his family. Connect on TwitterInstagram, or at JasonSoroski.net.

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THE CURRENT NORMAL

Yesterday we celebrated the Resurrection like we never have never before. At least not in my lifetime. There were no worship teams, no egg hunts, no cantatas, no choirs, no pews, no Sunday Best.

Yesterday at my house it was just my wife and I in jammies in front of the TV streaming church services.

My guess is that your story, if not exactly the same, is similar.

COVID, COVID, COVID. I would love JUST ONE DAY without talking about it, thinking about it, dreaming about it. I long for a day free of any Corona anything.

As we all walk through this strange season of COVID Quarantine, there was, and is, a desire to return to normal. A desire to go back to Church, go back to work, go back to school, go back to eating out, go back to. . . . normal life!

A desire for anything that is normal.

BUT WHAT IF WE DIDN'T?

Don't get me wrong, I am ready for this thing to be over. I am praying for people to get back to work and have their lives handed back to them. To leave home and do things. I weep for those who have died of this virus, and the families who are mourning. It is horrible. Absolutely horrible.

At some point, things will return to what they were. But there is something in me that doesn't want it to return to exactly what it was before. Something that tells me we have been given an opportunity to reset and refocus on what needs to return, and what needs to be set aside for something better.

THE OLD NORMAL

Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing. - John 21:3

After the Resurrection, life had changed for the disciples. Everything was over. They had walked with Jesus, heard his voice, watched His death and seen him alive again. They had felt the greatest joy and the deepest pain, and now it was seemingly over.

Without a direction, they decided to go back to Normal. For them, normal was fishing, and so fishing they went. They essentially moved on as if it never happened, and took a three year trip into the past and picked up where they left off: in a fishing boat.

BUT THAT IS NOT WHAT WAS MEANT FOR THEM

Just as day was breaking, Jesus stood on the shore; yet the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. - John 21:4

They went back to normal, and were miserable. Until Jesus intervened. While the disciples went back to fishing and catching no fish (which seemed to happen to them often) Jesus was waiting.

Patiently.

Waiting for them to notice his presence. Waiting for their attention. Waiting for them to walk back out of their 'old' normal into the better things that he had for them.

He finally called out to them, "Do you have any fish?" Of course, the answer was "No". Jesus does the same to us when we return to a Christ-less, Faith-less normal:

"So I see you went back to what was normal before you knew me. How's that working for you?"

Our answer is always the same as Peter's: "It's not working at all."

So why do we try it?

Jesus said "Try fishing my way and throw the net to the other side" . Of course, they caught a lot of fish doing it his way. 153 to be exact.

The disciples were never meant to go back to normal. There was a new normal created for them where they were not fishermen but fishers of men. They were anointed and ordained Shepherds of people and bearers of the Good News.

Peter was so miserable in his own decision to return to normal that once he realized Jesus was on the shore he jumped out and swam back to him. A tired, wet, depressed and defeated old fisherman who had finally had enough.

Once he returned to Jesus, there is no recorded evidence to suggest he returned to the boat.

Ever.

LET'S TRY A NEW NORMAL

When this is over, we will return to normal. But it is my prayer that we will focus our eyes on Christ NOW, that we will prepare our hearts for normal BEFORE we get there, and decide who we will be.

Yesterday we celebrated an empty tomb and a risen king.

Right now, he is standing on the shore, waiting for us to follow him before this is all over. Should we try to return to the boat, to normal, to stress, to politics, to anger, to whatever distraction we thought we needed before, I pray to God that we figure it out quick, jump out of it and swim hard away from it.

Will we go back to a life based on what we know, or based on who he is?

Will we struggle in our own abilities, or succeed in his?

I am praying that when all this is over, I will be a better man than I was before all this, to emerge with a desire to do life in his strength and not my own.

I tried all that before and ended up with a lot of empty nets.

My family, my community and my God require something better.

Jason Soroski is a homeschool dad and author of A Journey to Bethlehem: Inspiring Thoughts for Christmas and Hope for the New Year. He serves as worship pastor and in Colorado and spends his weekends exploring the Rocky Mountains with his family. Connect on TwitterInstagram, or at JasonSoroski.net.

Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day. As we consider WWII, the rise of Nazi Germany, and the horrific atrocities that came with it, I am reminded that it was not really that long ago.
People who lived through that nightmare are still here.
Still alive and still sharing their stories.
Still wearing the numbers etched into their forearms.
Still bearing the physical and emotional scars of an experience I can barely imagine.
The holocaust is not ancient history. In the grand scheme of things, it is recent history:  so recent that it could almost be considered a current event.
We would do well to remember that every time we marginalize 'the other' we are only a few steps away from the horror that now exists only in black and white images.
That a society which justified imprisoning, murdering, and attempting to completely annihilate an entire group of people is just barely in our collective rearview mirror.
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We live a in a culture that feeds off division. A culture that works tirelessly to parcel us off into segments, to unify us against 'the other' with whom we would disagree. Against those we would villainize. Against those we would dehumanize. Against those we would be happy to be without. The horror of millions murdered en masse without cause seems unreal to us, but in reality we are always just a few steps away. Neither is Anti-Semitism merely a 20th century phenomenon. The Jewish people have faced large-scale persecution for centuries, and it continues today. We hear more and more of Jewish groups attacked simply for being Jewish. While many of us have learned the truth, it seems many still are yet to learn. This is why it is so important that We Remember. That we face the past demons of humanity and join in proclaiming that so long as we have anything to do with it, this evil will happen Never Again.

Jason Soroski is a homeschool dad and author of A Journey to Bethlehem: Inspiring Thoughts for Christmas and Hope for the New Year. He serves as worship pastor and in Colorado and spends his weekends exploring the Rocky Mountains with his family. Connect on TwitterInstagram, or at JasonSoroski.net.

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