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Goose and Mav, Revisited - I Do Every Day - December 18, 2019

  • 2019 Dec 18

Goose and Mav, Revisited

By Janel Breitenstein

When I first heard Top Gun 2 was coming out, it had me reminiscing about the original cultural icon and how it swept up an entire generation. Of Goose and Maverick speeding toward all the villains behind their dark visors, twisting in combat.

It’s like that in marriage, isn’t it? We’re both in a battle, often with enemies unseen.

Perhaps God was foreshadowing this invisible combat in Genesis when he described Eve with the Hebrew word ezer, the word we translate as helper. Did you know the word is only used elsewhere to describe a military ally or God Himself as helper? You might say an ezer is an old-school wingman.

There are a lot of ways I want to be my husband’s shield. But there’s one glaring way I could leave my wingman: Who else is praying for my husband like a spouse could?

I can hear many of the enemies, so to speak, whizzing by his ear. I see them opening fire. 

I see when he’s weary of his mission or when a flank is exposed.

I know when he’s low on ammo against our mutual foes. I witness our constant need for supernatural protection and rescue.

No one else sees him like I do, knows the atmosphere around him. Of all the seven billion people in the world, there’s one most equipped to pray for my man.

Rather than praying out of obligation, I long to be this kind of vigilant ally. To never leave him spiritually isolated. To pray “at all times in the Spirit, with all prayer and supplication. (Ephesians 6:18).

That verse goes on to encourage us to pray for “all the saints”... But I especially want to make sure I’m doing it for the one I fly with. 

Listen to Barbara Rainey talk about how being your husband’s helper includes helping him be all he can be. 

The good stuff: For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. (Ephesians 6:12

Action points: Develop a habit of continually praying for your spouse as the two of you converse, lifting them to God specifically and with compassion. You could also set a reminder on your phone to pray for your spouse—perhaps on your commute or while you eat lunch. 

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